2021 Big Ideas for Curious lowest Minds: An outlet sale Introduction to Philosophy online

2021 Big Ideas for Curious lowest Minds: An outlet sale Introduction to Philosophy online

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A used book that may have some cosmetic wear (i.e. shelf-wear, slightly torn or missing dust jacket, dented corner, pages may include limited notes and highlighting)
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Description

Product Description

Children are, in many ways, born philosophers.

Without prompting, they ask some of the largest questions about time, mortality, happiness and the meaning of it all. Yet too often this inborn curiosity is not developed and, with age, the questions fall away.

This is a book designed to harness children''s spontaneous philosophical instinct and to develop it through introductions to some of the most vibrant and essential philosophical ideas of history. The book takes us to meet leading figures of philosophy from around the world and from all eras - and shows us how their ideas continue to matter.

The book functions as an ideal introduction to philosophy, as well as a charming way to open up conversations between adults and children about the biggest questions we all face.

What people are saying about Big Ideas for Curious Minds:

"This is an absolute must have for ALL children. It is absolutely fantastic and helps children understand a number of their daily struggles. In fact I take that previous comment back, this is an absolute must for EVERYONE. I have had read it from cover to cover, and as a 40 year old woman I have honestly learnt something new." Freddies Mummy UK

"This is a beautifully produced book published by the School of Life (founded by well known philosopher Alain de Botton). It is a very accessible starting point for exploring philosophy and how philosophical ideas can be applied to everyday life, in fact it is very explicit about this." Ewingel

"I can''t stop reading and talking about this book with others. It is easy to follow and great for an introduction to philosophy for kids. Well written, great illustrations, ideas and clever how it relates the philosophers'' ideas to the lives and issues that children have. 5 stars!" Thomas Leesa

"The book itself is genius with an introduction to leading figures of philosophy from around the world from all eras. Alongside that there are chapters teaching our children crucial lessons about life, about love, and about loss. Topics such as ''Why you feel lonely'' , ''Politeness matters'' , ''People are unhappy not mean'' , and ''The mind-body problem'' offer invaluable insights into philosophy in a way that our children can really get on board with. When the book arrived and I had a quick glance through it, my immediate reaction was that it was far too old for my children. And yet when I took the time to start reading, and to admire the beautiful illustrations, I found myself still sat there, an hour later, realising that this was exactly the kind of book I want each of my children to read as they grow." Five Little Doves

"The focus of these chapters are incredibly meaningful, some of my favourites include ''People are unhappy, not mean'', ''Learn to say what s on your mind'', ''Good things are (unexpectedly) hard'' and ''Politeness matters''. The book has been written by the fantastic School of Life and it is suggested for curious minds aged 9+. I think most adults would also find these ideas incredibly helpful to reflect on; who doesn''t need reminding that when someone is angry, maybe it''s not you who is responsible?" Louise Treherne, Role Models

"Although Big Ideas for Curious Minds is aimed at children I have got a lot from it too and I wish I had read it myself as a child... This book has taught me, and LP, new ways of thinking and new ways of being." What the Redhead Said

Review

Featured in The Guardian''s Best Children''s Books of 2018: "Our pick was Big Ideas for Curious Minds: An Introduction to Philosophy – a plain-speaking guide to philosophers, what matters and how to deal with things. A nine-year-old of my acquaintance was struck by a Mary Wollstonecraft idea – “why we hate cheap things” – about rarity and value." - The Guardian

"The first book for children from The School of Life seeks to connect young readers to influential thinkers … The volume distills “big ideas” from 25 heavy-hitting philosophers … into simple precepts. Each idea sits in a dedicated chapter, presented in a conversational style … and explained with accessible scenarios. A useful … introduction to emotional intelligence via philosophical thought." – Publishers Weekly

“An ideal introduction to philosophy, as well as a charming way to open up conversations between adults and children about the biggest questions we all face ... Big Ideas for Curious Minds is especially and unreservedly recommended for family, school, and community library collections.” – Midwest Book Review

"An eye-opening introduction to philosophy for young readers … the book makes great ideas accessible without watering them down, showing confidence in its audience’s ability to wrestle with real questions. Within Big Ideas for Curious Minds, philosophy isn’t useless, boring, or just for grownups; it’s vibrant and full of wisdom for preteens and young teens, too." – Foreword Reviews

"Introspective, thoughtful kids ages 8 and up may find this book interesting to ponder. Parents nearing the end of patience for their tweens may want to leave this book lying around for browsing." – Youth Services Book Review

"A formidable introduction for a middle schooler interested in philosophy and a reference book that offers more than Wikipedia. Strongly recommended for middle school libraries looking for high quality nonfiction reference books." – School Library Journal

“The book itself is genius with an introduction to leading figures of philosophy from around the world from all eras… Topics such as ‘Why you feel lonely’, ‘Politeness matters’, ‘People are unhappy not mean’, and ‘The mind-body problem’ offer invaluable insights into philosophy in a way that our children can really get on board with.” – Laura, blogger at five little doves

"I absolutely LOVE this book!!!!! This guide to wisdom and happiness is beautifully written. The tone and voice are exceptional for kids and the lessons are IMPORTANT. Positive self-esteem and coping strategies are necessary to mental health and stability; something that is often overlooked with our young children. As an adult, it reinforced all of the problem solving and self-talk techniques that I am constantly reminding myself to practice day to day! Big Ideas for Curious Minds should be a required read for all children and parents. This world would be a better place if we could understand ourselves and communicate and empathize with others. Thank you for the experience." - Maria Conn, Read-Ability

"This book is a wonderful collection of philosophical concepts. It takes ideas and questions that children have and provides good explanations of how everyone can grapple with these philosophical concepts. This is definitely a book I would recommend for everyone who has an interest in learning some of the basics of philosophy in a simplified way.” - Kids Book Buzz

About the Author

The School of Life is a global organization helping people lead more fulfilled lives. Through our range of books, gifts and stationery we aim to prompt more thoughtful natures and help everyone to find fulfillment. The School of Life is a resource for exploring self-knowledge, relationships, work, socializing, finding calm, and enjoying culture through content, community, and conversation. You can find us online, in stores and in welcoming spaces around the world offering classes, events, and one-to-one therapy sessions.

The School of Life is a rapidly growing global brand, with over 6 million YouTube subscribers, 351,000 Facebook followers, 218,000 Instagram followers and 163,000 Twitter followers.

The School of Life Press brings together the thinking and ideas of the School of Life creative team under the direction of series editor, Alain de Botton. Their books share a coherent, curated message that speaks with one voice: calm, reassuring, and sane.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Philosophy is quite a mysterious subject that most people don’t know anything about. The average school doesn’t teach it, the average adult does not understand it, and the whole subject can seem odd and kind of unnecessary. That’s a real pity because in fact, philosophy has a lot to teach everyone, whatever their age. It might even be the most important subject you will ever study. This book wants to open the door for you― to show you what philosophy is all about, and how it can help you to understand life. The word ‘philosophy’ itself gives us a bit of a clue as to why the subject matters. It’s originally a word from Ancient Greek: the first part, philo, means ‘love’ (philately means the love of stamps). The second part, which comes from the word sophia, means ‘wisdom’. So, when you put the two parts together― philo-sophy―it literally means ‘the love of wisdom’. Philosophy helps us to live wise lives. But what does ‘wisdom’ mean? It’s not very obvious, at first. Is being wise just about being clever? No, it’s much more than that. It’s about being sensible, kind, calm and accepting of how life can sometimes be (which isn’t always perfect, and sometimes really quite hard). To get a better idea of what wisdom might involve, we can think about its opposite: not being wise. Imagine that your mum loses her keys. There are unwise ways she might deal with this. Maybe she starts shouting at other people: ‘Who moved my car keys?’ (even though probably no one did move them). Or maybe she gets into a panic and throws herself onto the sofa, moaning that she’s a complete idiot and that her entire life is ruined. Poor mum! What would a wiser mum do? Instead of ranting and raving, or starting to panic straight away, she would think: ‘Well, car keys do tend to get lost from time to time. I must have put them somewhere… maybe they’re in the coat I was wearing yesterday.’ She could ask (calmly) if you had seen them, and she might even laugh about how silly she was to forget where she’d put them. There are lots of situations where you can see the difference between unwise and wise ways of dealing with stuff that happens. There are lots of problems, both big and small, in everyone’s life―including yours, too, of course. We can never get rid of them entirely (though we try hard), but we can all get better at how we deal with our problems. We can try not to get angry so often, try to shout less, and try not to panic or hurt the people we love. Philosophy tries to help us act more wisely when facing the problems in our lives that we can’t do much about.

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4.8 out of 54.8 out of 5
925 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Kitchen Drone
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
For curious minds from age eight to 80.
Reviewed in the United States on November 4, 2018
My eight-year-old God-daughter stays with us two days a week. The chapter-stories are short, well crafted and she seemed to enjoy them. Then after the third story she announced that she didn’t like that green book about being curious. This led to a discussion of... See more
My eight-year-old God-daughter stays with us two days a week. The chapter-stories are short, well crafted and she seemed to enjoy them. Then after the third story she announced that she didn’t like that green book about being curious.

This led to a discussion of the importance of words as mind pictures that we tell each other what we mean. After an extended conversation using the stories in the book she came to an understanding of the importance of the concept each story illustrates. She now has a special place she keeps the book for her next session.

My wife overheard our discussion of one of the first lesson and said, “I never knew that. Everyone should read that book.

Based on my experience age eight to 10 is probably the earliest entry age. The book works best in a one-on-one format with the adult questioning and listening. Limiting stories to one per day, after a brief review of previous stories, has the most impact.

She is now so proud that she can explain the word philosophy.
50 people found this helpful
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Terra
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Beautiful resource for all ages!
Reviewed in the United States on September 15, 2019
I bought this for my nine-year old who is interested in philosophy and ended up reading it myself as well and recommending to other families: it’s so nice! Short, bite-sized chapters introduce a concept on a practical level (examples of philosophical ideas on small scale:... See more
I bought this for my nine-year old who is interested in philosophy and ended up reading it myself as well and recommending to other families: it’s so nice! Short, bite-sized chapters introduce a concept on a practical level (examples of philosophical ideas on small scale: why your sister may be angry but it isn’t really about you!), then introduces the person who pioneered the idea. I was pleased to see that unlike most philosophy books geared toward children, it isn’t focused solely on western thought and did well highlighting women and people of color with big ideas, too. Lightly illustrated, extremely British and delightfully readable!
16 people found this helpful
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Mammanyc53
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Life changing - essential for all families
Reviewed in the United States on December 8, 2020
This book opened our eyes to the wonders of human behavior. We enjoy reading a chapter a night. The discussion that ensues is unlike that from any other book we’ve read as a family. Through this book, we’ve discovered the root of struggles, the causes behind feelings and... See more
This book opened our eyes to the wonders of human behavior. We enjoy reading a chapter a night. The discussion that ensues is unlike that from any other book we’ve read as a family. Through this book, we’ve discovered the root of struggles, the causes behind feelings and behaviors - good and bad - and have been moved to a heightened awareness of our actions and how they might impact others. This is an essential read for anyone, transformational for adults and children alike. My older son gave up screen time after the first chapter, my younger found an interior determination to work harder in school, and my husband and I are becoming better and more understanding better. I’m sure this will remain a staple in our evening rotation. I’d give it ten stars if I could.
9 people found this helpful
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Bill Jones
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Perfect for reading at bedtime
Reviewed in the United States on November 12, 2018
Imagine if Alain de Botton wrote an advice column suitable for kids but equally enjoyable and useful for adults. It would be this book--filled with one- to two-page simply worded yet profound contemplations on life that really crystallize the psychically nebulous... See more
Imagine if Alain de Botton wrote an advice column suitable for kids but equally enjoyable and useful for adults. It would be this book--filled with one- to two-page simply worded yet profound contemplations on life that really crystallize the psychically nebulous interactions we have each day. And when read together with your child at bedtime, the conclusions of these Big Ideas act like deceptively simple but quietly beautiful still life paintings that relax us so deeply after a long crazy day.
15 people found this helpful
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HammockGirl
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Cherished Time
Reviewed in the United States on June 18, 2020
We are having the best conversations as a result of this book. Everyone needs this for kids between the ages of 8 - 13. During Covid, we’re reading 1-2 chapters/week over lunch. The recollections & insights she has as we tie it the learnings to our personal lives &... See more
We are having the best conversations as a result of this book. Everyone needs this for kids between the ages of 8 - 13. During Covid, we’re reading 1-2 chapters/week over lunch. The recollections & insights she has as we tie it the learnings to our personal lives & experience . . . I will always cherish the gift of these memories. She may not yet know, but this is a memory she will carry fondly forever.
5 people found this helpful
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LDenely
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not exactly a philosophy book, but my daughter seems to enjoy it.
Reviewed in the United States on September 8, 2021
I do like this book. I am giving it 3 stars because it is not as good as I hoped it would be. It''s a bit light on philosophy and a bit heavy on what seems like a world-view, held by the author(s), that is a bit harsh on adult life. You may want to screen this book before... See more
I do like this book. I am giving it 3 stars because it is not as good as I hoped it would be. It''s a bit light on philosophy and a bit heavy on what seems like a world-view, held by the author(s), that is a bit harsh on adult life. You may want to screen this book before letting your kid read it, especially if they are sensitive or prone to getting depressed about the prospect of adulthood. The history pieces are not as entertaining for kids as I hoped. I would have preferred more bits like Androcles and the Lion. And the links between philosophers and the ideas presented are not 100% accurate but more a light approximation. However, many of the ideas "explored" ("addressed" more than "explored," hence not very philosophical) are interesting and good ones for kids 8-14 to be thinking about. The book disappointingly gives answers more than raises questions for kids to think over. Still, I would recommend this book as a primer for parents who want to have meaningful conversations with their kids about life in general: problems they may encounter now and in the future like bullies, parental divorce, career goals, marriage. In other words, a parent could mine the book for ideas to discuss and find out more about what kids are thinking or feeling, but maybe not hand the book over (or read word-for-word) to a sensitive younger child. The book''s goal seems to be to make steely-eyed realists of us all, but I''m not sure I would want that for an 8-year-old. Maybe a 12-14-year-old needs to be exposed to that vision. On the other hand, information like "When mom is angry, it is probably not about you but something else you are unaware of" could be very helpful to a sensitive 8-year-old.
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West Coast King
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Very small formatting can''t even read
Reviewed in the United States on March 21, 2019
For some reason I can''t zoom it to make the font bigger in this E-book. It''s very small and hard to read. If I would have known I would have just ordered a physical copy. In it''s current state I would not recommend the E-book.
9 people found this helpful
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Karol
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Excellent craftsmanship and selection of light topics from philosophy
Reviewed in the United States on February 3, 2020
I really like the physical aspect of this book - the pleasant pictures, the sturdy back. The topics are not hard core philosophy, but still touch on a lot of serious topics. The addition of how topics relate to specific authors and inclusion of curious details also gives a... See more
I really like the physical aspect of this book - the pleasant pictures, the sturdy back. The topics are not hard core philosophy, but still touch on a lot of serious topics. The addition of how topics relate to specific authors and inclusion of curious details also gives a special touch that makes the book more interesting to children.
2 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Jon
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Junior School of Life
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 24, 2018
I love this book. I''m a big fan of the School of Life and its approach of gently applying ideas from philosophy to soothe our everyday woes. Big Ideas for Curious Minds takes the School''s "consolations of philosophy" approach and presents it in a form suitable for...See more
I love this book. I''m a big fan of the School of Life and its approach of gently applying ideas from philosophy to soothe our everyday woes. Big Ideas for Curious Minds takes the School''s "consolations of philosophy" approach and presents it in a form suitable for children. The ideas presented are practical, focusing on problems we all have and which affect children too. What things really make me happy? Do I want the right things? Why are other people mean to me sometimes? What is the real reason I''m in a bad mood? Each problem is presented and then framed in terms of a particular philosopher''s viewpoint. The viewpoints are chosen to help children develop an understanding of why they - and others - feel the way they feel and of how they can think about things to feel better. I hope this will give my children a bit of a mental toolkit to help them through life. The philosophers themselves are introduced with a short biography and some nicely drawn portraits, a bit like "Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls". If you liked that book, you''ll like this one too. Big Ideas for Curious Minds would make an ideal stocking filler for a bright pre-teen.
19 people found this helpful
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S.K.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Got my kids interested in Philosophy
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 24, 2019
The first book I bought on Philosophy for my children. I used to study for a Philosophy degree and have an interest in it. I home educate and wondered how I was going to introduce this subject a bit more formally to my 10 and 12 year old without boring them, as most...See more
The first book I bought on Philosophy for my children. I used to study for a Philosophy degree and have an interest in it. I home educate and wondered how I was going to introduce this subject a bit more formally to my 10 and 12 year old without boring them, as most Philosophy books are too dense for most children. Besides, my children are all dyslexic, and although one was a good reader, the other is not very, so would be put off easily by having to read dense material. This was the perfect starter. I would read an idea every 2 or 3 days to them and we do the suggested activities too. We always have a discussion afterwards. I’ve since moved on to other slightly more formal Philosophy books for children which are more dense and definitely do need a bit more time for them to absorb the material, but this really was the best book to start them off with. My children love Philosophy now.
10 people found this helpful
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17
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This book should be read by every child and parent!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 4, 2019
I searched for a book about philosophy for my 9 year old son after he told me he is interested in this subject. I came across this book and took a chance. We have only been reading this book for the past two nights. I can’t praise this book high enough. The topics are quite...See more
I searched for a book about philosophy for my 9 year old son after he told me he is interested in this subject. I came across this book and took a chance. We have only been reading this book for the past two nights. I can’t praise this book high enough. The topics are quite deep but nevertheless easy to read to kids and raises some very good issues that us adults face as well in everyday life. Very good advices for kids and make them think about important and big questions about life. I have had very interesting discussions with my 9 year old and some of the things he said to me genuinely surprised me. A book that should be read in school and at home!
6 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Terrible Kindle version
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 2, 2020
I cannot review the contents as I could not read it. The Kindle version of the book is awful. The purchase was made for a child who is dyslexic and benefits from a larger font. However, the page appeared tiny on the screen and the text smaller still. I could not increase...See more
I cannot review the contents as I could not read it. The Kindle version of the book is awful. The purchase was made for a child who is dyslexic and benefits from a larger font. However, the page appeared tiny on the screen and the text smaller still. I could not increase the font size. This made it hared for him to read it and very taxing with my eyesight, to read it to him. After the first page of ''What is philosophy?'' we discontinued reading it as it was plain stressful. There was also no provision to convert text to voice which made hearing the book impossible. A wasted £10. SHAME.
6 people found this helpful
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Happy Holly
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fantastic book 10/10!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 12, 2018
Fantastic book! Had my 10 year old hooked from the first page. He didn’t want it to end and is actually reading it again! - A rare occurrence. Encourages children to refocus their normal perspective and think around people’s differing motivations and thinking. Great book! 👍See more
Fantastic book! Had my 10 year old hooked from the first page. He didn’t want it to end and is actually reading it again! - A rare occurrence. Encourages children to refocus their normal perspective and think around people’s differing motivations and thinking. Great book! 👍
8 people found this helpful
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Description

Product Description

Children are, in many ways, born philosophers.

Without prompting, they ask some of the largest questions about time, mortality, happiness and the meaning of it all. Yet too often this inborn curiosity is not developed and, with age, the questions fall away.

This is a book designed to harness children''s spontaneous philosophical instinct and to develop it through introductions to some of the most vibrant and essential philosophical ideas of history. The book takes us to meet leading figures of philosophy from around the world and from all eras - and shows us how their ideas continue to matter.

The book functions as an ideal introduction to philosophy, as well as a charming way to open up conversations between adults and children about the biggest questions we all face.

What people are saying about Big Ideas for Curious Minds:

"This is an absolute must have for ALL children. It is absolutely fantastic and helps children understand a number of their daily struggles. In fact I take that previous comment back, this is an absolute must for EVERYONE. I have had read it from cover to cover, and as a 40 year old woman I have honestly learnt something new." Freddies Mummy UK

"This is a beautifully produced book published by the School of Life (founded by well known philosopher Alain de Botton). It is a very accessible starting point for exploring philosophy and how philosophical ideas can be applied to everyday life, in fact it is very explicit about this." Ewingel

"I can''t stop reading and talking about this book with others. It is easy to follow and great for an introduction to philosophy for kids. Well written, great illustrations, ideas and clever how it relates the philosophers'' ideas to the lives and issues that children have. 5 stars!" Thomas Leesa

"The book itself is genius with an introduction to leading figures of philosophy from around the world from all eras. Alongside that there are chapters teaching our children crucial lessons about life, about love, and about loss. Topics such as ''Why you feel lonely'' , ''Politeness matters'' , ''People are unhappy not mean'' , and ''The mind-body problem'' offer invaluable insights into philosophy in a way that our children can really get on board with. When the book arrived and I had a quick glance through it, my immediate reaction was that it was far too old for my children. And yet when I took the time to start reading, and to admire the beautiful illustrations, I found myself still sat there, an hour later, realising that this was exactly the kind of book I want each of my children to read as they grow." Five Little Doves

"The focus of these chapters are incredibly meaningful, some of my favourites include ''People are unhappy, not mean'', ''Learn to say what s on your mind'', ''Good things are (unexpectedly) hard'' and ''Politeness matters''. The book has been written by the fantastic School of Life and it is suggested for curious minds aged 9+. I think most adults would also find these ideas incredibly helpful to reflect on; who doesn''t need reminding that when someone is angry, maybe it''s not you who is responsible?" Louise Treherne, Role Models

"Although Big Ideas for Curious Minds is aimed at children I have got a lot from it too and I wish I had read it myself as a child... This book has taught me, and LP, new ways of thinking and new ways of being." What the Redhead Said

Review

Featured in The Guardian''s Best Children''s Books of 2018: "Our pick was Big Ideas for Curious Minds: An Introduction to Philosophy – a plain-speaking guide to philosophers, what matters and how to deal with things. A nine-year-old of my acquaintance was struck by a Mary Wollstonecraft idea – “why we hate cheap things” – about rarity and value." - The Guardian

"The first book for children from The School of Life seeks to connect young readers to influential thinkers … The volume distills “big ideas” from 25 heavy-hitting philosophers … into simple precepts. Each idea sits in a dedicated chapter, presented in a conversational style … and explained with accessible scenarios. A useful … introduction to emotional intelligence via philosophical thought." – Publishers Weekly

“An ideal introduction to philosophy, as well as a charming way to open up conversations between adults and children about the biggest questions we all face ... Big Ideas for Curious Minds is especially and unreservedly recommended for family, school, and community library collections.” – Midwest Book Review

"An eye-opening introduction to philosophy for young readers … the book makes great ideas accessible without watering them down, showing confidence in its audience’s ability to wrestle with real questions. Within Big Ideas for Curious Minds, philosophy isn’t useless, boring, or just for grownups; it’s vibrant and full of wisdom for preteens and young teens, too." – Foreword Reviews

"Introspective, thoughtful kids ages 8 and up may find this book interesting to ponder. Parents nearing the end of patience for their tweens may want to leave this book lying around for browsing." – Youth Services Book Review

"A formidable introduction for a middle schooler interested in philosophy and a reference book that offers more than Wikipedia. Strongly recommended for middle school libraries looking for high quality nonfiction reference books." – School Library Journal

“The book itself is genius with an introduction to leading figures of philosophy from around the world from all eras… Topics such as ‘Why you feel lonely’, ‘Politeness matters’, ‘People are unhappy not mean’, and ‘The mind-body problem’ offer invaluable insights into philosophy in a way that our children can really get on board with.” – Laura, blogger at five little doves

"I absolutely LOVE this book!!!!! This guide to wisdom and happiness is beautifully written. The tone and voice are exceptional for kids and the lessons are IMPORTANT. Positive self-esteem and coping strategies are necessary to mental health and stability; something that is often overlooked with our young children. As an adult, it reinforced all of the problem solving and self-talk techniques that I am constantly reminding myself to practice day to day! Big Ideas for Curious Minds should be a required read for all children and parents. This world would be a better place if we could understand ourselves and communicate and empathize with others. Thank you for the experience." - Maria Conn, Read-Ability

"This book is a wonderful collection of philosophical concepts. It takes ideas and questions that children have and provides good explanations of how everyone can grapple with these philosophical concepts. This is definitely a book I would recommend for everyone who has an interest in learning some of the basics of philosophy in a simplified way.” - Kids Book Buzz

About the Author

The School of Life is a global organization helping people lead more fulfilled lives. Through our range of books, gifts and stationery we aim to prompt more thoughtful natures and help everyone to find fulfillment. The School of Life is a resource for exploring self-knowledge, relationships, work, socializing, finding calm, and enjoying culture through content, community, and conversation. You can find us online, in stores and in welcoming spaces around the world offering classes, events, and one-to-one therapy sessions.

The School of Life is a rapidly growing global brand, with over 6 million YouTube subscribers, 351,000 Facebook followers, 218,000 Instagram followers and 163,000 Twitter followers.

The School of Life Press brings together the thinking and ideas of the School of Life creative team under the direction of series editor, Alain de Botton. Their books share a coherent, curated message that speaks with one voice: calm, reassuring, and sane.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Philosophy is quite a mysterious subject that most people don’t know anything about. The average school doesn’t teach it, the average adult does not understand it, and the whole subject can seem odd and kind of unnecessary. That’s a real pity because in fact, philosophy has a lot to teach everyone, whatever their age. It might even be the most important subject you will ever study. This book wants to open the door for you― to show you what philosophy is all about, and how it can help you to understand life. The word ‘philosophy’ itself gives us a bit of a clue as to why the subject matters. It’s originally a word from Ancient Greek: the first part, philo, means ‘love’ (philately means the love of stamps). The second part, which comes from the word sophia, means ‘wisdom’. So, when you put the two parts together― philo-sophy―it literally means ‘the love of wisdom’. Philosophy helps us to live wise lives. But what does ‘wisdom’ mean? It’s not very obvious, at first. Is being wise just about being clever? No, it’s much more than that. It’s about being sensible, kind, calm and accepting of how life can sometimes be (which isn’t always perfect, and sometimes really quite hard). To get a better idea of what wisdom might involve, we can think about its opposite: not being wise. Imagine that your mum loses her keys. There are unwise ways she might deal with this. Maybe she starts shouting at other people: ‘Who moved my car keys?’ (even though probably no one did move them). Or maybe she gets into a panic and throws herself onto the sofa, moaning that she’s a complete idiot and that her entire life is ruined. Poor mum! What would a wiser mum do? Instead of ranting and raving, or starting to panic straight away, she would think: ‘Well, car keys do tend to get lost from time to time. I must have put them somewhere… maybe they’re in the coat I was wearing yesterday.’ She could ask (calmly) if you had seen them, and she might even laugh about how silly she was to forget where she’d put them. There are lots of situations where you can see the difference between unwise and wise ways of dealing with stuff that happens. There are lots of problems, both big and small, in everyone’s life―including yours, too, of course. We can never get rid of them entirely (though we try hard), but we can all get better at how we deal with our problems. We can try not to get angry so often, try to shout less, and try not to panic or hurt the people we love. Philosophy tries to help us act more wisely when facing the problems in our lives that we can’t do much about.

Product information

2021 Big Ideas for Curious lowest Minds: An outlet sale Introduction to Philosophy online

2021 Big Ideas for Curious lowest Minds: An outlet sale Introduction to Philosophy online

2021 Big Ideas for Curious lowest Minds: An outlet sale Introduction to Philosophy online

2021 Big Ideas for Curious lowest Minds: An outlet sale Introduction to Philosophy online

2021 Big Ideas for Curious lowest Minds: An outlet sale Introduction to Philosophy online

2021 Big Ideas for Curious lowest Minds: An outlet sale Introduction to Philosophy online

2021 Big Ideas for Curious lowest Minds: An outlet sale Introduction to Philosophy online

2021 Big Ideas for Curious lowest Minds: An outlet sale Introduction to Philosophy online

2021 Big Ideas for Curious lowest Minds: An outlet sale Introduction to Philosophy online

2021 Big Ideas for Curious lowest Minds: An outlet sale Introduction to Philosophy online

2021 Big Ideas for Curious lowest Minds: An outlet sale Introduction to Philosophy online

2021 Big Ideas for Curious lowest Minds: An outlet sale Introduction to Philosophy online

2021 Big Ideas for Curious lowest Minds: An outlet sale Introduction to Philosophy online

2021 Big Ideas for Curious lowest Minds: An outlet sale Introduction to Philosophy online

2021 Big Ideas for Curious lowest Minds: An outlet sale Introduction to Philosophy online

2021 Big Ideas for Curious lowest Minds: An outlet sale Introduction to Philosophy online

2021 Big Ideas for Curious lowest Minds: An outlet sale Introduction to Philosophy online

2021 Big Ideas for Curious lowest Minds: An outlet sale Introduction to Philosophy online

2021 Big Ideas for Curious lowest Minds: An outlet sale Introduction to Philosophy online

2021 Big Ideas for Curious lowest Minds: An outlet sale Introduction to Philosophy online

2021 Big Ideas for Curious lowest Minds: An outlet sale Introduction to Philosophy online

2021 Big Ideas for Curious lowest Minds: An outlet sale Introduction to Philosophy online

2021 Big Ideas for Curious lowest Minds: An outlet sale Introduction to Philosophy online

2021 Big Ideas for Curious lowest Minds: An outlet sale Introduction to Philosophy online

2021 Big Ideas for Curious lowest Minds: An outlet sale Introduction to Philosophy online

2021 Big Ideas for Curious lowest Minds: An outlet sale Introduction to Philosophy online

2021 Big Ideas for Curious lowest Minds: An outlet sale Introduction to Philosophy online

2021 Big Ideas for Curious lowest Minds: An outlet sale Introduction to Philosophy online

2021 Big Ideas for Curious lowest Minds: An outlet sale Introduction to Philosophy online