2021 Dining In: lowest Highly Cookable wholesale Recipes: A Cookbook outlet online sale

2021 Dining In: lowest Highly Cookable wholesale Recipes: A Cookbook outlet online sale

2021 Dining In: lowest Highly Cookable wholesale Recipes: A Cookbook outlet online sale
2021 Dining In: lowest Highly Cookable wholesale Recipes: A Cookbook outlet online sale__left
2021 Dining In: lowest Highly Cookable wholesale Recipes: A Cookbook outlet online sale_top
2021 Dining In: lowest Highly Cookable wholesale Recipes: A Cookbook outlet online sale__below
2021 Dining In: lowest Highly Cookable wholesale Recipes: A Cookbook outlet online sale__right
2021 Dining In: lowest Highly Cookable wholesale Recipes: A Cookbook outlet online sale__front

Description

Product Description

Discover the cookbook featuring “drool-worthy yet decidedly unfussy food” (Goop) that set today’s trends and is fast becoming a modern classic.

“This is not a cookbook. It’s a treasure map.”—Samin Nosrat, author of Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST COOKBOOKS OF THE YEAR BY San Francisco Chronicle • NPR • Epicurious • Newsday • KCRW’s Good Food • The Fader • American Express Essentials

Alison Roman’s Salted Butter and Chocolate Chunk Shortbread  made her Instagram-famous. But all of the recipes in  Dining In have one thing in common: they make even the most oven-phobic or restaurant-crazed person want to stay home and cook. They prove that casual doesn’t have to mean boring, simple doesn’t have to be uninspired, and that more steps or ingredients don’t always translate to a better plate of food. 

Vegetable-forward but with an affinity for a mean steak and a deep regard for fresh fish,  Dining In is  all about building flavor and saving time. Alison’s ingenuity seduces seasoned cooks, while her warm, edgy writing makes these recipes practical and approachable enough for the novice. With 125 recipes for effortlessly chic dishes that are full of quick-trick techniques (think slathering roast chicken in anchovy butter, roasting citrus to ramp up the flavor, and keeping boiled potatoes in the fridge for instant crispy smashed potatoes), she proves that dining in brings you just as much joy as eating out.

Praise for Dining In

“Sorry, restaurants. Superstar Alison Roman has given us recipes so delicious, so meltdown-proof—and so fun to read—we’re going to be cooking at home for a while. Quite possibly forever.” —Christine Muhlke, editor at large, Bon Appétit

“Anyone who wants the aesthetic, quality, and creativity of a Brooklyn restaurant without having to go to a Brooklyn restaurant will love Alison Roman’s cookbook. It’s filled with recipes that are both unique and approachable. Reading it, you’ll find yourself thinking ‘I would have never thought of making this but I want to make it right now.’” BuzzFeed

Dining In is exactly how I want to cook: with bright, fresh flavors, minimal technique, and no pretense. This isn’t just a bunch of great recipes, but a manifesto on how one original, opinionated home cook sees the world.” —Amanda Hesser, co-founder, Food52

Review

“Alison Roman joyously leads you to the promised land of extraordinary home cooking. Into every one of her stunningly beautiful recipes she''s tucked the clues that will invariably lead you to deliciousness: keep it simple, have fun with your food, pack in the flavor, and, most importantly, share it with the people you love.”— Samin Nosrat, bestselling author of Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat

“Alison Roman combines expertise with ease.  Dining In should make Brooklynesque restaurants around the country nervous. Why would you dine out when you can roast chicken in anchovy butter and toast up croutons in the schmaltzy, umami-tastic butter, or make crispy chickpeas and lamb with greens and garlicky yogurt?” Bon Appétit

“Never too fancy, Alison solves the greatest mystery every home cook faces—how to transform thoughtful food into a greater-than-the-sum-of-its-parts one-pan-wonder or next-level crowd-pleasing masterpiece.” —Christina Tosi, author of Momofuku Milk Bar

“Roman''s voice is funny and energetic and such a change of pace from the usual short-and-robotic recipe format.”— Bon Appétit online

“Not your grandmother’s all-purpose cookbook.” —Food52

“A classic waiting to happen.”— Epicurious

“Former pastry chef and food editor Alison Roman’s first book is a collection of recipes that speak to this moment in modern dining: One-pot dinners, sharable plates, casual desserts. Roman makes clever use of pantry staples and condiments to season and draw flavor out of winter vegetables and slowly simmered stews.” Eater 

“[Roman''s] recipes feature plenty of ‘it’ ingredients, like kimchi, pistachios,and za’atar, but they all make delicious, craveworthy sense. Flipping through  Dining In, I wanted to read every word and make every dish; there’s not too many cookbooks I can say that about.” Fine Cooking

“Designed to make your weeknight dinner more delicious and less fussy.” —The Kitchn

“You might walk right past this cookbook, with its modest title and quiet design, but take my advice and stop for a closer look. . . . Nearly every recipe I tried was a desert-island dish: blistered green beans with creamy tahini, cumin lamb chops with charred scallions and peanuts, salted butter and chocolate chunk shortbread. Definitely for dining in, as the title suggests, since you''ll want your privacy as you''re licking every last crumb off your plate.” —T. Susan Chang, NPR

“Alison Roman, who has cooked in restaurants and editorial kitchens, reads a little like a contemporary Colwin–in that her voice dances with energy and wit and self-awareness and intelligence. She seems to have little interest in precious cooking, fancy kitchen gadgets or anything that distracts from honest ingredients and foolproof techniques. To read Alison Roman is to feel a kind of instantaneous kinship.”— The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

“Like your best friend who’s a great cook, [Alison Roman]  spends a lot of ink up front persuading you that, yes, you can do this, you can cook. And as your best friend, she speaks to you in a conspiratorial tone and keeps things easy. Her recipes rely less on tricky technique than on clever flavor and textural combinations. Everything seems thrown together in a breezy manner, but the genius is evident. . . . Every recipe seems ‘highly cookable,’ her catchphrase, and craveable. And any chef who admits she likes black olives from a can ‘that you can wear on your fingers’ is someone we’ll follow into that kitchen.” Chicago Tribune

“Roman’s book is filled with plenty [of] inventive ideas that would work just as well for a weeknight meal as for a high-stakes dinner party.” Vogue

“This isn’t one of those pretty cookbooks that sits on a shelf. It’s a pretty cookbook filled with winning recipes begging to be made.” The  Boston Globe

“Fun and approachable, and most likely better than most dishes you’d order eating out.” The San Francisco Chronicle

“Some of Roman’s greatest hits.” The Cut

“One of the year’s best cookbooks.” —Joanna Goddard, A Cup of Jo 

“Very much a reflection of how we eat now.” —Mind Body Green

“I am always wondering what Alison Roman is cooking because, without fail, it''s just what I want to make (Sour Cream Flatbread! Vinegar-Braised Chicken!). From her relaxed approach to her inventive combinations, Alison’s indispensable recipes are easy to prepare and fun to eat and make home the best place to dine.”— Julia Turshen, author of Small Victories 

“Unpretentious, inspired, invigorating, Alison Roman’s voice is exactly what I’ve been waiting for in cookbooks. Within hours of opening  Dining In, the irresistible Anchovy-Butter Chicken was in the oven. Dining In is destined to be a beloved, food-stained, dog-eared Bible for a new generation of cooks.”— Stephanie Danler, bestselling author of Sweetbitter

Dining In is more than just a long list of super interesting recipes — it''s a book that will probably fundamentally change the way I cook. Recipes with unfussy new techniques like her Anchovy-Butter Chicken with Chicken Fat Croutons (with some radishes on the side!) produce ridiculously pleasing results that have inspired me to always take that extra little step. The book is filled with sneaky gems meant to steal the show at dinner parties. Make her Salted Butter & Chocolate Chunk Shortbread for dessert and you''ll never be mad again.” —Myles Tanzer, The Fader

About the Author

Alison Roman is a columnist for the  New York Times Food section and  Bon Appétit. She is the author of the bestselling  Dining In, named a best cookbook of the year by NPR, the San Francisco Chronicle, and Epicurious, among others. A native of Los Angeles, Alison lives in Brooklyn.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

CARAMELIZED WINTER SQUASH WITH TOASTED COCONUT GREMOLATA 
Serves Four
 
I ate a lot of squash with brown sugar and butter while growing up. This recipe is my more practical “I can’t have ice cream for every meal” compromise, using honey instead of brown sugar and coconut oil instead of butter. I would probably eat this as dinner on its own, but I happen to know it’s also great as a side with things like roasted chicken or pork chops. 
 
While tender, caramelized, salty-sweet squash is magnificent all on its own, it should be mentioned that the real reason for making this dish is for the toasted coconut gremolata: chips of nutty, unsweetened coconut tossed with herbs, lots of lemon zest, and a bit of Aleppo pepper. It’s wildly addictive, and there is no reason it couldn’t appear over roasted carrots, sprinkled onto a curry or stew, or even over salads as a stand-in for croutons. 
 
DO AHEAD: Everything but the coconut can be made 1 day ahead; when ready to serve, toast the coconut and add it to the chive mixture (toasted coconut will start to soften once mixed with the herbs and refrigerated). 
 
 
SQUASH 
2 medium winter squash, such as delicata or acorn (1½ to 2 pounds) 
3 tablespoons coconut oil, melted, or olive oil 
1 tablespoon honey 
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper 

TOASTED COCONUT GREMOLATA 

¾ cup unsweetened coconut chips 
¼ cup finely chopped fresh chives 
½ cup fresh cilantro, tender leaves and stems, finely chopped 
1 tablespoon finely grated lemon zest 
2 teaspoons Aleppo pepper or 1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes 
Kosher salt 
 
 
ROAST THE SQUASH:
Preheat the oven to 425°F. 

Leaving the skin on, slice the squash into ½-inch-thick rings. (I roast my squash with the seeds still inside, because they get all crispy and I love the texture they bring to the table, but you can remove them if you like. Best way to do that is cut the squash in half crosswise and scoop out the seeds with a spoon, then slice into rings.) 

Toss the squash with the coconut oil and honey on a rimmed baking sheet and season with salt and pepper. Roast, flipping the squash once, until it is completely tender, browned, and caramelized, 25 to 30 minutes. 

MAKE THE GREMOLATA:
While the squash is roasting, heat a small skillet over medium heat and add the coconut. Shake the skillet occasionally until the coconut is starting to brown at the edges and smells all toasty and amazing, 3 to 4 minutes.

Place it in a medium bowl to cool completely. 

Once the coconut has cooled, add the chives, cilantro, lemon zest, and Aleppo pepper, and season with salt. Using your fingers, mix this together until the oils in the lemon zest have released and everything is evenly distributed (especially the lemon zest, which can stubbornly clump up). 

Sprinkle the coconut gremolata over the roasted squash and serve. 

Product information

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Videos

Help others learn more about this product by uploading a video!
Upload video
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

More items to explore

Customer reviews

4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
1,306 global ratings

Reviews with videos

Reviews with images

Top reviews from the United States

Hannah Shireman
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great recipes, poor editing
Reviewed in the United States on August 23, 2018
I have made at least five recipes from this cookbook and loved them all. I plan to cook through the whole book! However, there are quite a few editing mistakes. For example, a recipe will call for two cups of something in the ingredient list but then only one cup in the... See more
I have made at least five recipes from this cookbook and loved them all. I plan to cook through the whole book! However, there are quite a few editing mistakes. For example, a recipe will call for two cups of something in the ingredient list but then only one cup in the directions, ever explaining where the additional cup goes in the recipe.
104 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Alyson
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Uninspired
Reviewed in the United States on August 22, 2018
Unfortunately, I am returning my copy. I am an adventurous cook and eater and have no problem going on a journey to source different ingredients and enjoy a variety of flavor combinations. However, I found very few of the recipes to be interesting and the photos very... See more
Unfortunately, I am returning my copy. I am an adventurous cook and eater and have no problem going on a journey to source different ingredients and enjoy a variety of flavor combinations. However, I found very few of the recipes to be interesting and the photos very bland. There was only one recipe that interested me - bacon roasted pork tenderloin with caraway''d cabbage and apples and I certainly don''t need to keep this book for that simple recipe. There are so many wonderful cookbooks out there right now and this simply cannot hold it''s weight against them. Too hipster for me.
103 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
great412
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Kinda Funky
Reviewed in the United States on January 15, 2019
I am a very seasoned, culinary school educated cook. I love reading cookbooks and I have at least 1000. Most of the time I change up recipes to meet my needs and taste. This book came with so much fuss and puff that I just had to have it. Funny, I do like her style, her... See more
I am a very seasoned, culinary school educated cook. I love reading cookbooks and I have at least 1000. Most of the time I change up recipes to meet my needs and taste. This book came with so much fuss and puff that I just had to have it. Funny, I do like her style, her panache at writing and fun whimsy but...... the food and recipes are funky, the editing poor, and the pictures so so. I have made a number of the recipes and find them just simply average. I am not sure who this is written for, the home cook, the educated cook, I am just not sure.
85 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
I Do The Speed LimitTop Contributor: Cooking
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An undercurrent of excitement and energy thrums through this book. This is a style of cooking that I''ll gladly embrace!
Reviewed in the United States on October 26, 2017
Here''s my interpretation of what’s happening in this cookbook--the rhyme and reason, the practical and logical, the science and intuition of it: It''s a beautiful, easy, exciting cooking style that Alison Roman has developed, and she walks us through that unique style in... See more
Here''s my interpretation of what’s happening in this cookbook--the rhyme and reason, the practical and logical, the science and intuition of it: It''s a beautiful, easy, exciting cooking style that Alison Roman has developed, and she walks us through that unique style in these recipes. With her excellent communicative writing, she has graciously offered us the insight into how her cooking style develops: Dish by dish, dish after dish, ingredients are paired to get a balance of textures: Meaty, creamy, crunchy, crispy, chewy. Hot and cold, raw and cooked, dimensions are utilized to help create interest and excitement. Roman''s recipes exhibit how to keep pairing to get a balance of flavors: Savory, sweet, salty, bitter, bland and intense umami. She uses herbs and spices, plus home-made condiments (recipes included), to help complete the dish and bring it all home. When plated, tweak for a pleasing look.

Most importantly—Alison Roman shows us how easy this all can come together. Shows us how all this can be accomplished with a minimum of effort and short ingredient lists. It seems to be her nature to do things in an easy way. And isn’t it grand that she is willing to show us her way? She says her kitchen is unorganized, but it is obvious to see that her thoughts and ability to plan are anything but. Her intuition and thoughtful planning combines to give us perfect, easy-going, stress-free recipes.

Her writing is so personable: Her logical, quirky, laid-back attitudes are touched with a sense of humor, and I sometimes found myself chuckling while I read. Not only are the recipes accessible and very do-able, straightforward and easy to understand, the book is very pleasing to read, too.

She uses a lot of vegetables, but does not shun meats, chicken and seafood. She uses a lot of greens, lemon and lime, nuts and seeds. She does not hold back the salt or the butter. It’s up to you to cut back, if necessary. Don''t let me scare you off, talking about butter. I think she is likes to act the playful temptress. She is set on eating healthy, it''s obvious in her food choices. And for those few butter-heavy dishes, well, there is plenty of kale, too!

Her vegetable dishes shine brightly and I love them best (because there can only be one “best”.) But all the chapters shine, and I’ve marked so many to try that I may as well have not marked any! Her salads are fun and full of themselves, not dainty and perfectly composed. She loves veggies and has incorporated them effortlessly into many, if not most of the dishes. (This is NOT a vegetarian cookbook, but vegetables are very prevalent.) Her fruit salads are really exciting and different, playing up more heat than sweet.

I was very pleased to see the large chapter "Grains and Things" and besides grains, includes fresh and dried beans, and a few pasta dishes. There is a unique and very pot-luck-able Four Bean Salad with a green romesco sauce, a split pea salad with both fresh and dried peas, "Kinda-Sweet" and "Not -Sweet granolas, There is an amazing baked bean recipe without ketchup, without BBQ sauce, and NOT sweet.

My husband, the biscuit and scone maker in the family, picked up the book and went directly to the back of it, where he got excited about her biscuits—both the recipe and her two-page essay on biscuit making. (There are many essays in this book—all of them fun to read, and you will come away with valuable and interesting information.) Then he got excited about the refrigerator chocolate chunk shortbread slice cookies. Then I had to see what he was so happy about, butted in, (sorry dear), turned a page, and got excited about the banana bread. All gems, all keepers. Many of her baking recipes are everyone''s old time favorites, but her take on them will have us rethinking, tweaking, or even replacing those old recipe cards.

By the way, the biscuit recipe alone is worth the price of this book.

She also loves pickles, and adds them to many dishes for crunch, tang, variety and visual appeal. She offers a brine and ideas for simple refrigerator quick pickles.

And she loves boiled small potatoes and stores a bowl of them in the frig. Since the cooking chore is completed in one big batch of potatoes at a time, taking them out of the frig and creating something with them, (a page full of ideas, essay form), is easy-peasy. (We love boiled potatoes, too… and I usually cook a big batch, skin on with a belly band peeled off, in a bath of heavy salt and Zatarans’s shrimp boil)

Her ideas are the kind that make you think, “Hey, why didn’t I think of that?!” For instance, I have already made the move to roasting my winter squash whole, then removing the seeds, and if necessary, the skin. Then I read this idea: Slice raw acorn and delicate squash—and leave the seeds attached to the slices. THEN roast the slices with their seeds. Tried her technique yesterday, about two hours after reading the tip. Gives an extra textural and visual feature to the dish, without any extra effort—actually it’s all less of an effort. Don’t want the seeds inside the slice on the plate? Fine, leave them in the pan and pick out just a few of the choice crunchy seeds and crispy-wispy threads to top each slice.
As a further interpretation/description of this book: I think “Dining In” is nestled in comfortably somewhere right between one of those approachable, well-thought-out-but-uninspiring “5-ingredient” cookbooks and those inspiring, but somewhat unapproachable, restaurant-chef exhibits of self-love. This book works exceeding well to get the creative juices flowing. You will want to set the book aside and head to the kitchen. Yet, as you are walking to the kitchen, you realize the book is still held tightly in hand.... You''ll find you just don''t want to let it go.

Here are some examples of how easy her style of cooking can be:
--A spicy hot honey browned butter recipe for drizzling over roasted sweet potatoes or winter squash. It can be made days ahead. It’s a recipe that can be doubled or tripled. It can be stored and reheated. It takes five minutes to make.
--Roasted Broccolini (or broccoli) with Lemon: Sound too easy? Or like something you’ve made before? Maybe. But there are a few other simple ingredients, and a roasting temperature and time that make it special. And easy.
--A toasted coconut gremolata for winter squash or sweet potatoes. I think it might work for other winter veggies, too. Like a mélange that includes parsnips and carrots and rutabaga and turnip and beets.
--Her favorite dish in this book is similar to one of my favorite vegetable braises: Radishes in butter. Except she does a quick cook of her radishes with tops on, and she adds fresh Za’atar.

And there''s so much more to get excited about in this book. I love it. Do you remember Rozanne Gold''s cookbook "Radically Simple"? Back in 2010? I can''t really pin down exactly why, but this book somehow reminds me of that one--maybe the excitement that rumbles through it like an undercurrent?. I still use that book by Gold, and I still wax poetic about it and urge people to buy it--even at almost 8 years old. If you liked Gold''s book, I''m pretty sure you will like this one.
205 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Taylor Blackburn
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fantastic
Reviewed in the United States on December 19, 2017
I’m a 24 year old woman whose always been able to find whatever recipe I wanted online, so I don’t really buy cookbooks. Truly, this is my first one. But something about Roman’s approach to “highly-cookable” food and rich flavors really appealed to me, and at $15 for a... See more
I’m a 24 year old woman whose always been able to find whatever recipe I wanted online, so I don’t really buy cookbooks. Truly, this is my first one. But something about Roman’s approach to “highly-cookable” food and rich flavors really appealed to me, and at $15 for a beautiful hardback, I thought why not. I have not been disappointed. The recipes feel fresh and exciting, but never unduly complicated. The day I got it, I cooked for a group of friends, and the anchovy butter chicken still gets love to this day. I’d grown tired of cooking at home, and Dining In made me incredibly excited about it again.

Try the smashed potatoes— truly the best potato I’ve eaten in my life.
89 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
A. Frank
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
BUY THIS BOOK. DO IT. DO IT.
Reviewed in the United States on November 28, 2017
Confession: I am a cookbook hoarder. I love to read them in bed, with my coffee in the morning, on sunday afternoons curled up with my dog on the couch. And yes, sometimes I like to cook out of them too. But let''s be honest, so many cookbooks these days are good for... See more
Confession: I am a cookbook hoarder. I love to read them in bed, with my coffee in the morning, on sunday afternoons curled up with my dog on the couch. And yes, sometimes I like to cook out of them too. But let''s be honest, so many cookbooks these days are good for inspiration only when you leave a normal, busy life and don''t have every spice under the stars in your pantry. This book, though, this book is good for EVERYTHING. Read it, read it again, cook out of it, cook out of it again. The recipes are inventive while still being approachable. It''s pure genius and everyone in my life will be receiving one for the holidays this year. BUY THIS COOKBOOK. DO IT. DO IT.
71 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
tha_slurpee_god
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An Investment For Your Social Status
Reviewed in the United States on November 28, 2017
I can''t cook at all, but thanks to the straight-forward recipes that are written in a way that real people can understand, even I can turn out a decent dish. The "anchovy-butter chicken" and "pasta with crispy squid" are now my go-to dishes whenever I want... See more
I can''t cook at all, but thanks to the straight-forward recipes that are written in a way that real people can understand, even I can turn out a decent dish. The "anchovy-butter chicken" and "pasta with crispy squid" are now my go-to dishes whenever I want people to think I have my life together. If all else fails, just having the book alone, with its beautiful imagery, high-quality construction and wonderfully contemporary aesthetic, is enough to fool people into thinking I''m sophisticated; even when I''m hosting a liquid dinner party.
In all seriousness, "Dining In" covers such a wide variety of cuisine in an accessible way, that I can see myself cooking from these recipes for a long time to come. I would recommend this book highly to anyone.
50 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Maree
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Going to the ‘donate’ pile.
Reviewed in the United States on September 13, 2018
I originally bought this book for a cookbook club- ‘book of the month’ earlier this year. I managed to find one recipe that I would bother cooking in that whole month. I’ve not cooked anything much from it since. I found the recipes on the whole... See more
I originally bought this book for a cookbook club- ‘book of the month’ earlier this year.

I managed to find one recipe that I would bother cooking in that whole month. I’ve not cooked anything much from it since.

I found the recipes on the whole uninspiring, derivative and bland. The photos are unattractive to my eye (cluttered for the main) and the paper the book is printed on is gratingly shiny.

What really annoys me, however, is that in the ‘Sweets’ recipe chapter (ie baking), the ingredients are measured in volume and metric equivalents are NOT provided.

Sure, Alison Roman might live in New York but when her book is available for order outside the US and she’s happy enough to accept ex-US sales, metric equivalents should be provided at least for the baking recipes. At the time of writing only three countries do not use the metric system- Libya, Burma/Myanmar and the US - AND US cups are not standard (ie metric) cups as a consequence.

Had I been able to peruse this book in a physical bookshop, I would not have purchased.
36 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report

Top reviews from other countries

Nancy
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Love it
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 17, 2019
Brilliant cookbook full of accessible recipes with clever new twists. Tons of great vegetable recipes - I''m addicted to the oil roasted mushrooms. Loved how the author explains the WHY of her recipes, passing on her years of kitchen experience, so you feel like you''re...See more
Brilliant cookbook full of accessible recipes with clever new twists. Tons of great vegetable recipes - I''m addicted to the oil roasted mushrooms. Loved how the author explains the WHY of her recipes, passing on her years of kitchen experience, so you feel like you''re picking up tips that you''ll take with you forever. Every single recipe I''ve tried has worked brilliantly, and she''s great at telling you why this is a good cake for transporting to a picnic, or why this salad travels well for work lunches. She''s like a younger, American Nigella, and I''m amazed she''s not better known outside the US.
9 people found this helpful
Report
quiglz
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Who needs to dine out?
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 24, 2018
I don''t know why this book hasn''t had more reviews, everything I''ve cooked from it has had rave reviews. Alison Roman''s wonderful recipes are easy enough to make but with twists that make them taste incredible, look impressive or both. Her chocolate chip shortbreads alone...See more
I don''t know why this book hasn''t had more reviews, everything I''ve cooked from it has had rave reviews. Alison Roman''s wonderful recipes are easy enough to make but with twists that make them taste incredible, look impressive or both. Her chocolate chip shortbreads alone were an internet sensation. Top recipes were her anchovy and garlic butter chicken. Once the chicken is cooked, you cook the tastiest croutons in the garlicky, anchovy butter chicken fat. Maybe the tastiest Roast Chicken recipe around. You can find it on Nigella''s cookbook corner. Her other recipes are delicious too.. spachcock chicken with fennel and paprika rub.. cooked slowly for the most juicy chicken meat. Another favourite is her slow cooked tomato pasta sauce.. tomatoes cooked slowly in oil, then at the last minute turned into one of the most deeply flavoured pasta sauces I''ve tried. I cannot recommend this book enough.
8 people found this helpful
Report
Sid Carlson
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Yes, you need this cookbook
Reviewed in Canada on December 15, 2017
I thought I didn’t need another cookbook, but this is a gem. I ordered it because it had so many rave reviews and those reviews were spot on. It arrived on a Monday morning and I’d read most of it by dinner time. The recipes are imaginative, very well-written, and I love...See more
I thought I didn’t need another cookbook, but this is a gem. I ordered it because it had so many rave reviews and those reviews were spot on. It arrived on a Monday morning and I’d read most of it by dinner time. The recipes are imaginative, very well-written, and I love that she devotes some attention to substitutes and variations. I think both new and experienced cooks would benefit from her ready exuberance with experimentation. And a whole chapter on condiments! That may not sound exciting, but in my experience condiments are a great way keep your menus interesting and varied. I’ve only tried four recipes so far, but they have all been keepers and I will certainly continue to work my way through things in the coming months.
8 people found this helpful
Report
Sophia Real
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Life-affirming
Reviewed in Germany on June 13, 2018
I read cookbooks like other people read novels and there is typically a stack of cookbooks right next to my bed for nighttime perusing. And yet, I am picky when it comes to buying cookbooks. So I hesitated when it came to ordering in. Yes, I was intrigued by Roman''s cooking...See more
I read cookbooks like other people read novels and there is typically a stack of cookbooks right next to my bed for nighttime perusing. And yet, I am picky when it comes to buying cookbooks. So I hesitated when it came to ordering in. Yes, I was intrigued by Roman''s cooking having seen a few of her clips on the internet. And yet, once that salted butter chocolate chip shortbread starting making the rounds on social media, the whole book became so hyped I was wary I would not enjoy the book. And boy was I wrong. Roman''s passion for good food and cooking jumps off every single page in this book, both in terms of her writing and her recipes. And the recipes are wonderful - all seem to pack a punch in terms of flavour but without any undue fuss. The kind of food you would love to serve or be served at a dinner party with your closest friends. I have only made the bucatini with roasted tomatoes and anchovies so far, but these are definitely going into regular rotation at mine (in fact I am planning on making them for dinner this evening!). And the rest of the book is covered in bookmarks for all the other things I want to make from it.
5 people found this helpful
Report
Danielle Little
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
BUY THIS BOOK 🙌🏻
Reviewed in Australia on February 29, 2020
I trust Alison Roman. I have many recipe books, but not all of them have recipes that consistently turn out. This book is different - not only do the recipes turn out, but it’s visually stunning and the recipes are a modern spin on ingredients that have become boring...See more
I trust Alison Roman. I have many recipe books, but not all of them have recipes that consistently turn out. This book is different - not only do the recipes turn out, but it’s visually stunning and the recipes are a modern spin on ingredients that have become boring (particularly her use of vegetables. So far recipes I’ve made include: ~ the Split Pea Salad - my family LOVED this. It’s basically a deconstructed pea and ham soup, but it’s delicious and different from your average salad (and it can be a meal in and of itself) ~Baked eggs with crushed chickpeas, chorizo and bread crumbs - a delicious breakfast or lazy dinner ~Crispy chickpeas and lamb with greens and garlicky yoghurt ~Olive oil fried lentils with cherry tomatoes and a Chile fried egg ~Roasted tomato and anchovy bucatini - this is delicious and not just your standard tomato sauce. Definitely recommend using the olive oil roasted tomato recipe to make this!!! And others on my soon cook list include: ~caramelised winter squash with toasted gremolata ~cold garlicky pasta with capers and salsa verde ~whole roasted snapper with harissa and tomatoes This book has stayed close to my kitchen since I’ve bought it. I strongly recommend it.
Report
See all reviews
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who bought this item also bought

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who viewed this item also viewed

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Pages with related products.

  • clarkson potter
  • original recipes
  • good healthy cookbooks
  • easy meal recipes
  • the best chocolate recipe books
  • Best New 2018 Cookbooks

Rhubarb-Almond Galette

Dining In: Highly Cookable Recipes by Alison Roman


Salted Butter and Chocolate Chunk Shortbread Cookies


Four-Bean Salad with Green Romesco


Roasted Tomato and Anchovy Bucatini

Skillet Chicken with Crushed Olives and Sumac

Serves 4

This is a pretty hot take, but I think bone-in, skin-on chicken might be the most delicious type of meat you can eat. The skin gets crispier than any bacon you could fry, and the fat left rendered in the skillet is worth the price of admission alone (once you have those briny olives coated in the stuff, you’ll see why).

This recipe can be infinitely adapted. Once you sear the thighs, feel free to add thinly sliced vegetables (such as fennel, turnips, or carrots), torn dark leafy greens, a rinsed and drained can of beans, or precooked grains into the skillet, coating them in that liquid gold and serving them alongside your new favorite way to eat chicken.

Recipe

1. Toss the onion with the lemon juice & season with salt & pepper; set aside. 2. Season the chicken with salt and pepper. Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the chicken, skin-side down, & cook until the skin is golden brown & crispy, 8 to 10 minutes.

Flip the chicken & continue to cook it until the bottom is golden brown & the chicken is cooked through, 5 to 8 minutes more.

3. Transfer the chicken to a large plate or cutting board. Add the olives, sumac, and ½ cup water to the skillet, stirring to scrape up those browned bits on the bottom.

4. Return the chicken to the skillet, skin-side up so it stays crispy, and cook over medium heat until the liquid has almost totally evaporated, about 4 minutes; remove from the heat. Add the red onion (plus any liquid) and toss to coat with the olives and the other bits. Transfer the chicken and olives to a large serving platter; scatter the herbs over the top before serving.

Ingredients

  • ½ small red onion, thinly sliced 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1½ pounds bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs (4 to 6, depending on size)
  • or bone-in, skin-on chicken breasts (2 or 3, depending on size)
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 cup pitted Castelvetrano olives, crushed
  • 1½ teaspoons ground sumac
  • 1 cup fresh herbs, such as parsley, mint, or dill

Product information

2021 Dining In: lowest Highly Cookable wholesale Recipes: A Cookbook outlet online sale

2021 Dining In: lowest Highly Cookable wholesale Recipes: A Cookbook outlet online sale

2021 Dining In: lowest Highly Cookable wholesale Recipes: A Cookbook outlet online sale

2021 Dining In: lowest Highly Cookable wholesale Recipes: A Cookbook outlet online sale

2021 Dining In: lowest Highly Cookable wholesale Recipes: A Cookbook outlet online sale

2021 Dining In: lowest Highly Cookable wholesale Recipes: A Cookbook outlet online sale

2021 Dining In: lowest Highly Cookable wholesale Recipes: A Cookbook outlet online sale

2021 Dining In: lowest Highly Cookable wholesale Recipes: A Cookbook outlet online sale

2021 Dining In: lowest Highly Cookable wholesale Recipes: A Cookbook outlet online sale

2021 Dining In: lowest Highly Cookable wholesale Recipes: A Cookbook outlet online sale

2021 Dining In: lowest Highly Cookable wholesale Recipes: A Cookbook outlet online sale

2021 Dining In: lowest Highly Cookable wholesale Recipes: A Cookbook outlet online sale

2021 Dining In: lowest Highly Cookable wholesale Recipes: A Cookbook outlet online sale

2021 Dining In: lowest Highly Cookable wholesale Recipes: A Cookbook outlet online sale

2021 Dining In: lowest Highly Cookable wholesale Recipes: A Cookbook outlet online sale

2021 Dining In: lowest Highly Cookable wholesale Recipes: A Cookbook outlet online sale

2021 Dining In: lowest Highly Cookable wholesale Recipes: A Cookbook outlet online sale

2021 Dining In: lowest Highly Cookable wholesale Recipes: A Cookbook outlet online sale

2021 Dining In: lowest Highly Cookable wholesale Recipes: A Cookbook outlet online sale

2021 Dining In: lowest Highly Cookable wholesale Recipes: A Cookbook outlet online sale

2021 Dining In: lowest Highly Cookable wholesale Recipes: A Cookbook outlet online sale

2021 Dining In: lowest Highly Cookable wholesale Recipes: A Cookbook outlet online sale

2021 Dining In: lowest Highly Cookable wholesale Recipes: A Cookbook outlet online sale

2021 Dining In: lowest Highly Cookable wholesale Recipes: A Cookbook outlet online sale

2021 Dining In: lowest Highly Cookable wholesale Recipes: A Cookbook outlet online sale

2021 Dining In: lowest Highly Cookable wholesale Recipes: A Cookbook outlet online sale

2021 Dining In: lowest Highly Cookable wholesale Recipes: A Cookbook outlet online sale

2021 Dining In: lowest Highly Cookable wholesale Recipes: A Cookbook outlet online sale