2021 new arrival The 2021 high quality Case Against Sugar online

2021 new arrival The 2021 high quality Case Against Sugar online

2021 new arrival The 2021 high quality Case Against Sugar online

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From the best-selling author of Why We Get Fat, a groundbreaking, eye-opening exposé that makes the convincing case that sugar is the tobacco of the new millennium: backed by powerful lobbies, entrenched in our lives, and making us very sick.

Among Americans, diabetes is more prevalent today than ever; obesity is at epidemic proportions; nearly 10% of children are thought to have nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. And sugar is at the root of these, and other, critical society-wide, health-related problems. With his signature command of both science and straight talk, Gary Taubes delves into Americans'' history with sugar: its uses as a preservative, as an additive in cigarettes, the contemporary overuse of high-fructose corn syrup. He explains what research has shown about our addiction to sweets. He clarifies the arguments against sugar, corrects misconceptions about the relationship between sugar and weight loss; and provides the perspective necessary to make informed decisions about sugar as individuals and as a society.

Review

"Taubes’s writing is both inflammatory and copiously researched. It is also well timed... Hard-charging (and I’ll add game-changing)." —Dan Barber, The New York Times

"[A] blitz of a book... Mr. Taubes’s argument is so persuasive that, after reading The Case Against Sugar, this functioning chocoholic cut out the Snacking Bark and stopped eating cakes and white bread... The Case Against Sugar should be a powerful weapon against future misinformation." —Eugenia Bone, The Wall Street Journal

"Compelling... Perhaps at long last, sugar is getting its just desserts." — The Economist

"Taubes builds his case through lawyerly layering of rich detail... Extraordinary and refreshing." — The Atlantic

"Taubes sifts through centuries’ worth of data... Practically everything one wants to know about sugar—its history, its geography, the addiction it causes—is here. In the end, each of us is confronted with a choice. Continue consuming sugar at our current level and suffer the ill effects. Or reduce, if not eliminate, it from our diet, thereby improving our odds of living a long, healthy life." — The Seattle Times

"I can''t think of another journalist who has had quite as profound an influence on the conversation about nutrition." —Michael Pollan

“[ The Case Against Sugar] should be required reading if only to understand the scope, power, and impact that Big Sugar has had on America’s health—or, perhaps more accurately, sickness.” — Outside

“Staggering… Taubes’s brilliant and accessible science writing has won him many fans.” — Booklist, starred review

"[Taubes] delivers another convincing book... Fascinating and illuminating.” — Library Journal

“[Taubes’s work is] compelling, as well as meticulously explained and researched. Readers will hate to love this book, since it will cause them to thoroughly rethink the place of sugar in their diets.” — Publishers Weekly

“[Taubes] helps us understand how to make better decisions regarding sugar as individuals and as a nation.” — Library Journal

“The obesity epidemic is an ever-growing threat to the overall health of our nation. In making the case against sugar, Gary Taubes details the often insidious efforts by the sugar industry to hide how harmful it is, just as the tobacco companies once did.  This is required reading for not only every parent, but every American.” —Katie Couric

“No one in this country has worked harder on or better understood the role of sugar in our diet than Gary Taubes. As a journalist, an investigator, a scientist, and an advocate, he is without peer. (Plus, he knows how to write.)  The Case Against Sugar is not only a terrific history but a forward-thinking document that can help us think more intelligently about how (and how not) to eat.” —Mark Bittman, author of How to Cook Everything Fast

“Once again, the brilliant Gary Taubes manages to make a complex scientific subject easy to understand.  The Case Against Sugar is a riveting history of ideas, a clear analysis of evidence, and an utterly persuasive argument that sugar is the new tobacco. Taubes methodically explains why sugar—not sloth, not fat—accounts for our unprecedented levels of obesity, cancer, diabetes, and heart disease. Taubes answers every counter-argument as he exposes bad research, reveals conflicts of interest, and explodes myths.” —Gretchen Rubin, author of The Happiness Project

“I am grateful beyond words for Gary Taubes''s courageous and meticulous documentation of the health dangers of sugar. No one has hit the political and economic forces behind this ''acceptable'' addiction as clearly and unflinchingly. The information in this book will, quite literally, save your life if you apply it." —Christiane Northrup, M.D., author of W omen’s Bodies, Women’s Wisdom

“If you ever doubted that sugar is the root cause of our obesity, diabetes, and heart disease epidemic, then look no further than The Case Against Sugar. This deeply researched, well-reasoned exploration of the history and biology of sugar would convince any supreme court of nutrition that it is sugar, not fat, that should be indicted and limited.  Doctors, scientists, policymakers, and concerned eaters would do well to heed Gary Taubes’s advice.” —Mark Hyman, M.D., author of The Blood Sugar Solution

The Case Against Sugar is just that. It’s a carefully reasoned, persuasive account of how doubts about sugar in the modern diet were systematically overlooked for over a century. Gary Taubes has become an important voice in the debate surrounding nutrition. He once again presents a compelling argument that will challenge our knowledge about the connection between food and health—it’s a must-read for anyone who wants to understand the impact of the ingredients we eat.” —Nathan Myhrvold, lead author of  Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Cooking

About the Author

GARY TAUBES is the author of Why We Get Fat and Good Calories, Bad Calories. He is a former staff writer for Discover and a correspondent for the journal Science. His writing has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The Atlantic, and Esquire, and has been included in numerous “Best of” anthologies, including The Best of the Best American Science Writing (2010). He has received three Science in Society Journalism Awards from the National Association of Science Writers. He is the recipient of a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Investigator Award in Health Policy Research and a co-founder of the Nutrition Science Initiative (NuSI). He lives in Oakland, California.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

INTRODUCTION

WHY DIABETES?

"Mary H—an unmarried woman, twenty-six years of age, came to the Out Patient Department of the Massachusetts General Hospital on August 2, 1893. She said her mouth was dry, that she was “drink- ing water all the time” and was compelled to rise three to four times each night to pass her urine. She felt “weak and tired.” Her appetite was variable; the bowels constipated and she had a dizzy headache. Belching of gas, a tight feeling in the abdomen, and a “burning” in the stomach followed her meals. She was short of breath." --Elliott Joslin’s diabetes “case no. 1,” as recorded in the case notes of his clinic.

Elliott Joslin was a medical student at Harvard in the summer of 1893, working as a clinical clerk at Massachusetts General Hos- pital, when he documented his rst consultation with a diabetic
patient. He was still a good three decades removed from becom- ing the most in uential diabetes specialist of the twentieth century. The patient was Mary Higgins, a young immigrant who had arrived from Ireland ve years previously and had been working as a domestic in a Boston suburb. She had “a severe form of diabetes mellitus,” Joslin noted, and her kidneys were already “succumbing to the strain put upon them” by the disease.

Joslin’s interest in diabetes dated to his undergraduate days at Yale, but it may have been Higgins who catalyzed his obsession. Over the next ve years, Joslin and Reginald Fitz, a renowned Har- vard pathologist, would comb through the “hundreds of volumes” of handwritten case notes of the Massachusetts General Hospital, looking for information that might shed light on the cause of the disease and perhaps suggest how to treat it. Joslin would travel twice to Europe, visiting medical centers in Germany and Austria, to learn from the most in uential diabetes experts of the era. 
In 1898, the same year Joslin established his private practice to specialize in the treatment of diabetics, he and Fitz presented their analysis of the Mass General case notes at the annual meeting of the American Medical Association in Denver. They had exam- ined the record of every patient treated at the hospital since 1824. What they saw, although they didn’t recognize it at the time, was the beginning of an epidemic.

Among the forty-eight thousand patients treated in that time period, a year shy of three-quarters of a century, a total of 172 had been diagnosed with diabetes. These patients represented only 0.3 percent of all cases at Mass General, but Joslin and Fitz detected a clear trend in the admissions: the number of patients with diabetes and the percentage of patients with diabetes had both been increasing steadily. As many diabetics were admitted to Mass General in the thirteen years after 1885 as in the sixty-one years prior. Joslin and Fitz considered several explanations, but they rejected the possibility that the disease itself was becoming more common. Instead, they attributed the increase in diabetic patients to a “wholesome tendency of diabetics to place themselves under careful medical supervision.” It wasn’t that more Bosto- nians were succumbing to diabetes year to year, they said, but that a greater proportion of those who did were taking themselves off to the hospital for treatment.

By January 1921, when Joslin published an article about his clinical experience with diabetes for The Journal of the American Medical Association, his opinion had changed considerably. He was no longer talking about the wholesome tendencies of diabetics to seek medical help, but was using the word “epidemic” to describe what he was witnessing. “On the broad street of a certain peaceful New England village there once stood three houses side by side,” he wrote, apparently talking about his hometown of Oxford, Massachusetts. “Into these three houses moved in succession four women and three men—heads of families—and of this number all but one subsequently succumbed to diabetes.” 

Joslin suggested that had these deaths been caused by an infec- tious disease—scarlet fever, perhaps, or typhoid, or tuberculosis— the local and state health departments would have mobilized investigative teams to establish the vectors of the disease and prevent further spread. “Consider the measures,” he wrote, “that would have been adopted to discover the source of the outbreak and to prevent a recurrence.” Because diabetes was a chronic dis- ease, not an infectious one, and because the deaths occurred over years and not in the span of a few weeks or months, they passed unnoticed. “Even the insurance companies,” Joslin wrote, “failed to grasp their significance.” 

*


We’ve grown accustomed, if not inured, to reading about the ongoing epidemic of obesity. Fifty years ago, one in eight American adults was obese; today the number is greater than one in three. The World Health Organization reports that obesity rates have doubled worldwide since 1980; in 2014, more than half a billion adults on the planet were obese, and more than forty million children under the age of ve were overweight or obese. Without doubt we’ve been getting fatter, a trend that can be traced back in the United States to the nineteenth century, but the epidemic of diabetes is a more intriguing, more telling phenomenon.

Diabetes was not a new diagnosis at the tail end of the nine- teenth century when Joslin did his rst accounting, rare as the disease might have been then. As far back as the sixth century b.c., Sushruta, a Hindu physician, had described the characteristic sweet urine of diabetes mellitus, and noted that it was most common in the overweight and the gluttonous. By the rst century a.d., the disease may have already been known as “diabetes”—a Greek term meaning “siphon” or “ owing through”—when Aretaeus of Cappodocia described its ultimate course if allowed to proceed untreated: “The patient does not survive long when it is completely established, for the marasmus [emaciation] produced is rapid, and death speedy. Life too is odious and painful, the thirst is ungov- ernable, and the copious potations are more than equaled by the profuse urinary discharge. . . . If he stop for a very brief period, and leave off drinking, the mouth becomes parched, the body dry; the bowels seem on re, he is wretched and uneasy, and soon dies, tormented with burning thirst.” 


Through the mid-nineteenth century, diabetes remained a rare af iction, to be discussed in medical texts and journal articles but rarely seen by physicians in their practices. As late as 1797, the British army surgeon John Rollo could publish “An Account of Two Cases of the Diabetes Mellitus,” a seminal paper in the history of the disease, and report that he had seen these cases nineteen years apart despite, as Rollo wrote, spending the intervening years “observ[ing] an extensive range of disease in America, the West Indies, and in England.” If the mortality records from Philadelphia in the early nineteenth century are any indication, the city’s resi- dents were as likely to die from diabetes, or at least to have diabetes attributed as the cause of their death, as they were to be murdered or to die from anthrax, hysteria, starvation, or lethargy.

In 1890, Robert Saundby, a former president of the Edinburgh Royal Medical Society, presented a series of lectures on diabetes to the Royal College of Physicians in London in which he estimated 
that less than one in every fty thousand died from the disease. Diabetes, said Saundby, is “one of those rarer diseases” that can only be studied by physicians who live in “great cent[er]s of popula- tion and have the extensive practice of a large hospital from which to draw their cases.” Saundby did note, though, that the mortality rate from diabetes was rising throughout England, in Paris, and even in New York. (At the same time, one Los Angeles physician, according to Saundby, reported “in seven years’ practice he had not met with a single case.”) “The truth,” Saundby said, “is that diabe- tes is getting to be a common disease in certain classes, especially the wealthier commercial classes.”

William Osler, the legendary Canadian physician often described as the “father of modern medicine,” also documented both the rarity and the rising tide of diabetes in the numerous editions of his seminal textbook, The Principles and Practice of Medicine. Osler joined the staff at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Bal- timore when the institution opened in 1889. In the first edition of his textbook, published three years later, Osler reported that, of the thirty- ve thousand patients under treatment at the hospital since its inception, only ten had been diagnosed with diabetes. In the next eight years, 156 cases were diagnosed. Mortality statistics, wrote Osler, suggested an exponential increase in those reportedly dying from the disease—nearly doubling between 1870 and 1890 and then more than doubling again by 1900.

By the late 1920s, Joslin’s epidemic of diabetes had become the subject of newspaper and magazine articles, while researchers in the United States and Europe were working to quantify accurately the prevalence of the disease, in a way that might allow meaningful comparisons to be drawn from year to year and decade to decade. In Copenhagen, for instance, the number of diabetics treated in the city’s hospitals increased from ten in 1890 to 608 in 1924—a sixty-fold increase. When the New York City health commissioner Haven Emerson and his colleague Louise Larimore published an 
analysis of diabetes mortality statistics in 1924, they reported a 400 percent increase in some American cities since 1900—almost 1,500 percent since the Civil War.

Despite all this, the disease remained a relatively rare one. When Joslin, working with Louis Dublin and Herbert Marks, both statis- ticians with the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, examined the existing evidence in 1934, he again concluded that diabetes was rapidly becoming a common disease, but only by the stan- dards of the day. He conservatively estimated—based on what he considered careful studies done in New York, Massachusetts, and elsewhere—that only two to three Americans in every thousand had diabetes.   

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4.5 out of 54.5 out of 5
1,074 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Julian Jaynes
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
What you need to know
Reviewed in the United States on April 20, 2019
I bought this book thinking it would provide me with relevant information about how sugar is bad for you and what foods cause related problems. Sadly that isn''t the goal of this book despite what you might think after reading the previews. This book is a 200... See more
I bought this book thinking it would provide me with relevant information about how sugar is bad for you and what foods cause related problems. Sadly that isn''t the goal of this book despite what you might think after reading the previews.

This book is a 200 page history of sugar and civilization - discovery, manufacturing, marketing, economics, regulation, etc - followed by 25 pages or so of somewhat relevant information. If you really want to the name of the scientist that did research on sugar and fat production or the name of the company that set up in Africa to export the stuff, then maybe this is the book you are looking for. That isn''t what I wanted. What I wanted was to know how sugar was harmful, what the negative pathways were, and whether other similar foods had similar issues. There is a small amount of that in the last 25 pages but its tucked into yet more excessive narative so it''s not much fun trying to dig it out.

The author wanted to write a long story. This book should have been called "The Story of Sugar". That would have been an honest title. If the author wanted to write a book titled "The Case Against Sugar", he could have done so in about 12 pages by providing dense, pertinent information to the reader.
205 people found this helpful
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Chuck Hamil
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Cut it out. Sugar that is.
Reviewed in the United States on July 5, 2018
To all the naysayers of Gary’s work, I am living proof that his research is solid and sound. Putting the information to the test, as someone at 310lbs, who loved sugar, carbs and was type 2 diabetic, I cut out all sugar in my diet as well as most carbs. Within six months, I... See more
To all the naysayers of Gary’s work, I am living proof that his research is solid and sound. Putting the information to the test, as someone at 310lbs, who loved sugar, carbs and was type 2 diabetic, I cut out all sugar in my diet as well as most carbs. Within six months, I lost 75 lbs and my A1C went from 8.6 to 6.4 and I no longer had to inject insulin on nightly basis. I cannot say enough good about this book and his previous two books. I look forward to his next book and thank him for his hard work.
122 people found this helpful
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Ira M. Edwards
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Two books about sugar addiction and chronic diseases
Reviewed in the United States on October 14, 2017
Two books taken together offer adequate evidence that sugar addiction stands out above all other factors among multiple causes of chronic diseases that became epidemic in recent times. Robert Lustig -- THE HACKING OF THE AMERICAN MIND Gary Taubes -- THE CASE... See more
Two books taken together offer adequate evidence that sugar addiction stands out above all other factors among multiple causes of chronic diseases that became epidemic in recent times.
Robert Lustig -- THE HACKING OF THE AMERICAN MIND
Gary Taubes -- THE CASE AGAINST SUGAR
Gary Taubes, as a journalist, demonstrates the best of objective science. Often a journalist makes the facts clearer than a scientist ever does. In his previous books, one stands out for public health relevance. That is WHY WE GET FAT.
Taubes makes a case for sugar as the main factor that, far above all else, is the reason we have epidemics of gout, high blood pressure, elevated blood glucose, insulin resistance, diabetes, arterial disease, cancer, Alzheimer''s disease and more. All of these are hormonally related to metabolic syndrome, the topic that put Lustig in the forefront of nutritional science. Taubes gives a historical background of opposing views fairly, with little condemnation, though much activity of sugar industry representatives could have been judged criminal.
Opposing views: "Chronic diseases are caused by overeating and under-activity. (more calories in than out.)" "Eat less and exercise more" has a history of failure, but heavily promoted by the industry with massive publicity efforts over many years. Some observers were not fooled, but they were few, and did not have the media presence of Frederick Stare and Ansel Keys.
My crude accusation: The industry-government-medical-media complex that tried to make sugar into a health food and denied its role in disease may have caused over 100,000,000 to die short of their normal life span, living their last years in misery. The death count and misery is rapidly growing even now.
Taubes quotes a reason for this opposition, other than self (selfish) interest: "As soon as we think we are right about something," as New Yorker writer Kathryn Schulz noted in the 2010 book BEING WRONG, we narrow our focus, attending only to details that support our belief, or ceasing to listen altogether."
Fortunately, Gary Taubes understands this.
This is my understanding of THE HACKING OF THE AMERICAN MIND by Robert Lustig: Sugar has the same neurohormonal paths in the brain as opiods. Sugar is addictive with brief hits of pleasure, but not satisfying, with long-range health consequences. We want more because a little is not satisfying. We crave more to the point of leaving other nutrients lacking, and food without sugar becomes tasteless. The book is not about sugar, though that may be Lustig''s most vital point. It is about addictions, hormones of pleasure and hormones of happiness that do not lead to contentment. Though I have studied nutrition and endocrinology for many years, that is not my main interest. I am interested in what Lustig says about sugar. I am author of an orthomolecular nutrition textbook, but my greater interest is in the health and welfare of many people I know who suffer from chronic diseases, or are heading that way.
I have a problem with Lustig''s writing about drugs. He overstated the value of psychoactive prescription drugs and seemed unaware of the extent of harm. I have seen too many lives destroyed by these to let that pass. His suggested that cannabanoids and even limited use of LSD may be more effective. They could hardly be worse.
I expect Taubes''s book to be the one that makes a difference in the world, with Lustig''s as vital scientific background, with both giving accounts of how the powers of this world hack the minds of all of us.
My conclusion:
1. Sugar excess is the major cause of modern chronic diseases.
2. Sugar is addictive and not satisfying. Excess leads to disappointment, not happiness or contentment.
3. Sugar substitutes have little evidence of benefit.
4. We can benefit greatly in prevention and treatment by reducing sugar to near the level used by our ancestors or non-industrial populations. Skipping deserts is a useless token, not a solution. Fruit is good, not fruit juice. Sweet drinks of all kinds are out. Most processed foods have sugar added, and must be regarded as toxic.
5. We need fat, even saturated fat, a spectrum of natural fats. Coconut oil, fish oil. bacon. Fats add flavor, satisfaction and satiety.
6. We need phytonutrients and minerals which are scarce in modern food.
7. Changing is hard. Changing is scary to anticipate, pleasant to remember.
If these two books are too much for you, try a fun but scientific book by Denise Minger: DEATH BY FOOD PYRIMID.
160 people found this helpful
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Steven Markham
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This Dentist is recommending this book for everyone for your teeth, heart, brain, pancreas, waistline, and longevity.
Reviewed in the United States on July 14, 2017
This book is fantastic. As a practicing dentist of 13 years, I have pondered the irony of the sweetness of sugar with the bitterness of the pain it causes the public with rampant decay and how destructive it really is. How powerfully destructive is sugar that takes the... See more
This book is fantastic. As a practicing dentist of 13 years, I have pondered the irony of the sweetness of sugar with the bitterness of the pain it causes the public with rampant decay and how destructive it really is. How powerfully destructive is sugar that takes the hardest most durable substance in your body (tooth enamel) and turns it into mush? Which in turn causes irreversible pulpitis the toothache that necessitates root canal therapy. What a burden on the American Public that we could avoid if we just let go of sugar. But we cling so tightly because it is a true national addiction. It is everywhere we go and in almost everything we consume, from the time we are born it represents everything "positive" that we celebrate as little babies. Well, it is obviously time to pivot and move toward natural sweeteners that are not so damaging and skip all the carcinogenic aspartames of the world. Taubes is like a dagger to the heart of the sugar industry. If you want to live a long healthy life with nice teeth and a nice body and keep your mind intact into your golden years I suggest you purchase this book and get off the crack, I mean sugar.
65 people found this helpful
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Sue Wilcox
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This book changed my life
Reviewed in the United States on October 5, 2017
This book changed my life: I have now completely given up sugar and anything that contains any form of sugar and anything that turns into sugar rapidly such as starch. What an eye opening dramatic tale of corruption, ignorance and stupidity. Whether humanity can survive... See more
This book changed my life: I have now completely given up sugar and anything that contains any form of sugar and anything that turns into sugar rapidly such as starch. What an eye opening dramatic tale of corruption, ignorance and stupidity. Whether humanity can survive its addiction to sugar seems dubious but the first step is to acknowledge it exists and has to be dealt with. On the positive side avoiding sugar would seem to have some major benefits - read the book and see if it''s enough to motivate you to give it up. Then see if you can come up with a plan to save the world.
34 people found this helpful
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C. Bridges
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Must read for sugarholics.
Reviewed in the United States on March 3, 2017
Absolute must-read for all those "hooked" on sugar. I am now 8 weeks sugar-free and loving it. Having studied this since the early 1970s, this is the best summary so far. I am a physician, M.D., and will be handing this out to all my patients.
82 people found this helpful
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Jimmy Moore from Livin' La Vida Low-Carb
5.0 out of 5 starsVine Customer Review of Free Product
Taubes Delivers Shot Across The Bow Challenging Big Sugar With Facts And History
Reviewed in the United States on October 14, 2016
If an investigative journalist could choose any other career to use their talents and gifts, then it would most likely be that of an attorney. They possess the natural skills for digging deeply into arguments and making compelling statements for the prosecution. That''s... See more
If an investigative journalist could choose any other career to use their talents and gifts, then it would most likely be that of an attorney. They possess the natural skills for digging deeply into arguments and making compelling statements for the prosecution. That''s precisely what New York Times bestselling author and science writer Gary Taubes has done in his soon-to-classic book The Case Against Sugar. This book has been sorely needed for many years and Taubes is the perfect author to articulate what needs to be shared as only he can.

For fans of Taubes who have read his two previous nutritional health classics-- Good Calories, Bad Calories: Fats, Carbs, and the Controversial Science of Diet and Health and Why We Get Fat: And What to Do About It --you already know his position on the negative implications of carbohydrates on the current state of chronic disease and health decline. In The Case Against Sugar, Taubes takes direct aim at the biggest culprit carb that is plaguing the health of those dealing with obesity, diabetes, heart disease, cancer, and more--it''s SUGAR!

Some people might scoff at the idea that we need an entire book all about the dangers of consuming sugar claiming that it''s obvious to most people that sugar is not good for you. But do they really know that? Walk into any grocery store, sporting event, amusement park, fast food restaurant, and anywhere else food is sold and you''ll mostly see nothing but ambivalence regarding sugar from a great majority of the population based on their purchasing habits. Sugar has become so pervasive in our food supply that it''s next to impossible to find anything to eat that doesn''t have sugar in it (even spaghetti sauce, baked beans, yogurt, BBQ sauce, ketchup, fruit juice...the list goes on and on!).

As I just noted, sugar has become so ubiquitous in our society now that people don''t even think twice about consuming it while simultaneously greatly fearing dietary fat as something they shouldn''t consume. Taubes addresses the idea of how we became propagandized to believe fat is the enemy in our diet. Since the publication of The Case For Sugar, we''ve now learned that The Sugar Association paid off Harvard scientists to squelch the connection between sugar and heart disease and vilify saturated fat. It''s fairly easy to see why The Case Against Sugar is needed now more than ever before. (Read the September 12, 2016 New York Times column on this topic entitled "How The Sugar Industry Shifted Blame To Fat": Google the title and you''ll find it!)

If you''re familiar with the work of Taubes, he goes very deeply into the subjects he writes about to get to the very core of the main issues at hand. He explains how we got to where we are today and puts the primary blame for the main instigator of pretty much all modern disease on sugar. That instigator is a condition known as insulin resistance (IR) where the pancreas has to work so hard at pumping out insulin to cover all the sugar we''ve been consuming that it''s become worn out and doesn''t function as it was intended anymore. The result of this is a much more difficult path to keep blood sugar and insulin levels normalized that requires people with IR to have to significantly cut down on the foods that turn to sugar in the body--all culprit carbohydrates. Or, as I like to refer to them, crappy carbage!

One of the excellent points Taubes makes in The Case For Sugar that will hopefully begin a public conversation of this concept is the modern argument against sugar has everything to do with "empty calories" they supposedly contain and not the hormonal effects it is having on our bodies. Bringing in the calorie argument gives license for people to continue eating sugar in the mythical "moderation" (which Taubes is very skeptical and no fan of). But the reality is the role sugar plays in your health goes so much deeper than their caloric effect, particularly for those people with insulin resistance where the damage is done. I know this fact all-too-well as someone who used to drink 16 cans of Coca-Cola daily before discovering these principles Taubes is sharing in his books requiring me to eat a low-carb, high-fat, ketogenic diet for the rest of my life in order to stave off the health consequences of the damage that happened to my body from eating sugar.

Methodically looking through all the faulty science used to defend sugar, Taubes again goes into bulldog mode pulling back the curtain on the Wizard of Oz to expose the facade we have been led to believe about sugar. What''s most interesting is there were researchers like John Yudkin who understood these problems with consuming sugar way back in the 60s/70s, but he was quickly ignored and blacklisted by those who wanted to push the anti-fat message as a means for propping up sugar-peddling companies that stood to greatly benefit financially from the ignorance of the general public. And it worked because junk food full of carbohydrates is the norm on store shelves today! Now that we realize that Yudkin was right all along, Taubes is attempting to explain where we go from here to undo all the nutritional indoctrination. It''s gonna be a steep uphill battle, but this book could very well be the beginning of the unraveling of the sugar ruse.

The Case Against Sugar should absolutely be required reading of every doctor, dietitian, teacher, parent, and anyone who wants to hear the truth about sugar that they''re just not gonna get from mainstream media or any of the so-called leaders in the nutritional health industry. Gary Taubes has put his stamp on this subject as only he can presenting the evidence for the reader to absorb and come to their own conclusions. After reading this book, you can still choose to eat sugar. But at least you''ll be armed with information about the entire picture on this subject instead of the one-sided view we''ve dealt with for the past 50 years. Consider this book the first shot across the bow challenging The Sugar Association head-on with facts and history that cannot be refuted. Now it''s simply a matter of undoing decades of misinformation to stem the tide of chronic disease we are currently living through because of the promulgation of sugar.
461 people found this helpful
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J. Rose
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not what I was expecting
Reviewed in the United States on October 20, 2019
This book provides a very detailed history of the sugar industry, and concludes with the (apparent) fact that scientists still can''t definitively say that sugar is the sole cause of diabetes, or even obesity. Because I was (perhaps mistakenly) expecting a book filled... See more
This book provides a very detailed history of the sugar industry, and concludes with the (apparent) fact that scientists still can''t definitively say that sugar is the sole cause of diabetes, or even obesity. Because I was (perhaps mistakenly) expecting a book filled primarily with medical and nutritional information, I was bored and disappointed after the first hundred pages or so. I pressed on, still hoping for some medical evidence proving sugar''s toxicity beyond a shadow of a doubt, but it never came.

Taubes asserts that likely we will never know for sure how bad sugar is, because by now the Western diet has been so inundated with it for so long that satisfactory scientific studies are all but impossible to conduct. Apparently there is now no way to compare the health of sugar-eaters to non-sugar-eaters (the way you can compare the health of smokers versus non-smokers, for example) because, since sugar has now been added to nearly everything we eat, non-sugar-eaters basically no longer exist. As such, it''s difficult to pinpoint one specific cause for our society''s upwardly-trending proliferation of diseases like diabetes, hypertension, Alzheimer''s, etc.

The book is exhaustively researched and meticulously detailed. Taubes shows that consumption of sugar is LIKELY the cause of many health issues, but does not (or cannot) show that it is the sole cause. If the science is truly not there, the fault does not lie with him. It''s possible I was expecting too much. For this, I have given the book three stars instead of one (as was my initial impulse). In conclusion, it''s likely that only those who are interested in the history of sugar (and the background behind the sugar industry) will find anything to enjoy here.
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JessH
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
If you care about your health, or your family''s, you need this book
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 6, 2018
Buy it! We all need to know this information. We have been led a merry nutritional dance over the last 40/50 years, and it''s killing us in large numbers. Fat was NEVER the problem. Sugar is toxic to humans (and most animals). Another book on this subject is John Yudkin''s...See more
Buy it! We all need to know this information. We have been led a merry nutritional dance over the last 40/50 years, and it''s killing us in large numbers. Fat was NEVER the problem. Sugar is toxic to humans (and most animals). Another book on this subject is John Yudkin''s "Pure White and Deadly". Read both as soon as you can. Also read "The Cholesterol Con" and if you know anyone with diabetes, then "Diabetes Unpacked" as well. Read up on this subject and ignore the main stream opinion created and ruled by big business who promote rubbish to eat because their profits are bigger.
39 people found this helpful
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Greg Hill
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A very compelling book against sugar.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 19, 2018
My wife and I are retiring on to our sailing boat in 2019 and plan to sail long distances across the oceans. Part of my preparations for both of us is our dietary considerations and I have been experimenting at home with a range of nutritional meal plans that we are likely...See more
My wife and I are retiring on to our sailing boat in 2019 and plan to sail long distances across the oceans. Part of my preparations for both of us is our dietary considerations and I have been experimenting at home with a range of nutritional meal plans that we are likely to be faced with whilst at sea for extended periods. One of the food plans was to cut out sugar and within 24hrs we both started to suffer from sugar withdrawal symptoms which are similar but more powerful than nicotine withdrawal. There is no question in my mind that sugar is a powerful and highly addictive substance. I have concluded that our meal plans for our sailing adventures will not include any kind of sugar nor sugar supplements. Only natural sugars from whole foods will be our only sucrose and fructose intakes. Thank you Gary for providing such a fascinating read, which really confirms in mind what my body was telling me as we gave up sugar.
25 people found this helpful
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Mark Hayhurst
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A very compelling case and the crimes have been understated
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 23, 2018
Having already been aware of Taubes''s youtubes and Rogan interviews I was very much looking forward to this and was not disappointed. The case against sugar is compelling and IMHO conclusive - sugar and carb overconsumption underpins ALL the major Western Diseases -...See more
Having already been aware of Taubes''s youtubes and Rogan interviews I was very much looking forward to this and was not disappointed. The case against sugar is compelling and IMHO conclusive - sugar and carb overconsumption underpins ALL the major Western Diseases - diabetes, gout, heart disease, alzheimers, hypertension, cancer - that is a very bold statement with massive implications for our society. The good news is that those implications are good if you read this and educate yourself and then adopt a Ketogenic way of eating. The "conspiracy" aspects of the story cannot also be overlooked and the damage wrought on the west by those to greedy or dogmatic to admit the truth is of untold proportions - don''t die of ignorance...
19 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Be warned about the deadly effects of consuming sugar in ...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 24, 2018
Be warned about the deadly effects of consuming sugar in any amount over the decades. As the author points out it is NOT the calories in sugar that we have to worry about but the adverse METABOLIC effects induced in the body after some years of sugar consumption.
21 people found this helpful
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dbh13
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Very Interesting
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 14, 2017
Very interesting read. Keep in mind that the author is arguing a case, so it is worth reading around more widely to gain a full and balanced appreciation of the arguments.
29 people found this helpful
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