2021 new arrival What I Talk About When I Talk About Running: A Memoir (Vintage International), Book Cover May lowest online Vary outlet sale

2021 new arrival What I Talk About When I Talk About Running: A Memoir (Vintage International), Book Cover May lowest online Vary outlet sale

2021 new arrival What I Talk About When I Talk About Running: A Memoir (Vintage International), Book Cover May lowest online Vary outlet sale
2021 new arrival What I Talk About When I Talk About Running: A Memoir (Vintage International), Book Cover May lowest online Vary outlet sale_top
2021 new arrival What I Talk About When I Talk About Running: A Memoir (Vintage International), Book Cover May lowest online Vary outlet sale__front

Description

Product Description

An intimate look at writing, running, and the incredible way they intersect, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running is an illuminating glimpse into the solitary passions of one of our greatest artists.

While training for the New York City Marathon, Haruki Murakami decided to keep a journal of his progress. The result is a memoir about his intertwined obsessions with running and writing, full of vivid recollections and insights, including the eureka moment when he decided to become a writer. By turns funny and sobering, playful and philosophical, here is a rich and revelatory work that elevates the human need for motion to an art form.

Review

“A fascinating portrait of Murakami’s working mind and how he works his magic on the page.” — The Plain Dealer"A brilliant meditation on how his running and writing nurture and sustain each other. . . . With spare, engaging prose . . . Murakami shares his runner''s high." — Sports Illustrated"Enthralling. . . . A quirky, brilliant gem."— Time Out New York"Murakami''s descriptive eye is as acute as ever. . . . Fascinating. . . . A glimpse into the creative process of one of the world''s great writers." — The Hartford Courant"A genuine memoir, filled with gentle minutiae that truly communicates the rhythm of Murakami''s daily life and work...Murakami actually offers himself whole." —Jesse Jarnow, Paste Magazine"A felicitous, casual series of reflections and anecdotes...[Murakami] has a Warholian way of tinting the mundane with mystery and restrained humor...Do still waters run deep? This paean to a runner''s life keeps us, pleasurably, wondering." —Joel Rice, The Tennessean"[ What I Talk About When I Talk About Running is] a graceful explanation of Mr. Murakami''s intertwining obsessions, conveyed with his characteristic ability to draw unexpected connections. Running may be a matter of placing one foot in front of the other on the ground, but, as is so often the case with Mr. Murakami, terrestrial objects have a tendency to take flight." —Chloë Schama, New York Sun"Beautifully written and full of great running aphorisms...Anyone who knows perseverance can appreciate this work." —Helen Montoya, San Antonio Express-News"Engaging, insightful... What I Talk About When I Talk About Running extends [Murakami''s] winning streak." —Jenny Shank, Sunday Camera"Murakami constructs this piecemeal narrative with the same masterful, accessible prose marked by humor and streaks of magic which has made him a household name, the same staggering insights, the same fascinating connections...this is exactly what makes Murakami so special: his ability to render everything a part of everything else, and to end with monumental poignancy...In an extremely personal, candid and moving way, the book makes one want to read and run at the same time." —Reynard Seifert, Austin Fit Magazine"[ What I Talk About When I Talk About Running] provides a fascinating portrait of Murakami''s working mind and how he works his magic on the page...[a] charming, sober little book." —John Freeman, Newark Star-Ledger"Highly recommended...Practical philosophy from a man whose insight into his own character, and how running both suits and shapes that character, is revelatory and can provide tools for readers to examine and improve their own lives."— Library Journal

About the Author

Haruki Murakami was born in Kyoto in 1949 and now lives near Tokyo. His work has been translated into forty-two languages. The most recent of his many honors is the Franz Kafka Prize. www.harukimurakami.com

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

AUGUST 5, 2005 . KAUAI, HAWAIIWho''s Going to Laugh at Mick Jagger?I''m on Kauai, in Hawaii, today, Friday, August 5, 2005. It''s unbelievably clear and sunny, not a cloud in the sky. As if the concept clouds doesn''t even exist. I came here at the end of July and, as always, we rented a condo. During the mornings, when it''s cool, I sit at my desk, writing all sorts of things. Like now: I''m writing this, a piece on running that I can pretty much compose as I wish. It''s summer, so naturally it''s hot. Hawaii''s been called the island of eternal summer, but since it''s in the Northern Hemisphere there are, arguably, four seasons of a sort. Summer is somewhat hotter than winter. I spend a lot of time in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and compared to Cambridge--so muggy and hot with all its bricks and concrete it''s like a form of torture--summer in Hawaii is a veritable paradise. No need for an air conditioner here--just leave the window open, and a refreshing breeze blows in. People in Cambridge are always surprised when they hear I''m spending August in Hawaii. "Why would you want to spend summer in a hot place like that?" they invariably ask. But they don''t know what it''s like. How the constant trade winds from the northeast make summers cool. How happy life is here, where we can enjoy lounging around, reading a book in the shade of trees, or, if the notion strikes us, go down, just as we are, for a dip in the inlet.Since I arrived in Hawaii I''ve run about an hour every day, six days a week. It''s two and a half months now since I resumed my old lifestyle in which, unless it''s totally unavoidable, I run every single day. Today I ran for an hour and ten minutes, listening on my Walkman to two albums by the Lovin'' Spoonful-- Daydream and Hums of the Lovin'' Spoonful--which I''d recorded on an MD disc.Right now I''m aiming at increasing the distance I run, so speed is less of an issue. As long as I can run a certain distance, that''s all I care about. Sometimes I run fast when I feel like it, but if I increase the pace I shorten the amount of time I run, the point being to let the exhilaration I feel at the end of each run carry over to the next day. This is the same sort of tack I find necessary when writing a novel. I stop every day right at the point where I feel I can write more. Do that, and the next day''s work goes surprisingly smoothly. I think Ernest Hemingway did something like that. To keep on going, you have to keep up the rhythm. This is the important thing for long-term projects. Once you set the pace, the rest will follow. The problem is getting the flywheel to spin at a set speed--and to get to that point takes as much concentration and effort as you can manage.It rained for a short time while I was running, but it was a cooling rain that felt good. A thick cloud blew in from the ocean right over me, and a gentle rain fell for a while, but then, as if it had remembered, "Oh, I''ve got to do some errands!," it whisked itself away without so much as a glance back. And then the merciless sun was back, scorching the ground. It''s a very easy-to-understand weather pattern. Nothing abstruse or ambivalent about it, not a speck of the metaphor or the symbolic. On the way I passed a few other joggers, about an equal number of men and women. The energetic ones were zipping down the road, slicing through the air like they had robbers at their heels. Others, overweight, huffed and puffed, their eyes half closed, their shoulders slumped like this was the last thing in the world they wanted to be doing. They looked like maybe a week ago their doctors had told them they have diabetes and warned them they had to start exercising. I''m somewhere in the middle.I love listening to the Lovin'' Spoonful. Their music is sort of laid-back and never pretentious. Listening to this soothing music brings back a lot of memories of the 1960s. Nothing really special, though. If they were to make a movie about my life (just the thought of which scares me), these would be the scenes they''d leave on the cutting-room floor. "We can leave this episode out," the editor would explain. "It''s not bad, but it''s sort of ordinary and doesn''t amount to much." Those kinds of memories--unpretentious, commonplace. But for me, they''re all meaningful and valuable. As each of these memories flits across my mind, I''m sure I unconsciously smile, or give a slight frown. Commonplace they might be, but the accumulation of these memories has led to one result: me. Me here and now, on the north shore of Kauai. Sometimes when I think of life, I feel like a piece of driftwood washed up on shore.As I run, the trade winds blowing in from the direction of the lighthouse rustle the leaves of the eucalyptus over my head.I began living in Cambridge, Massachusetts, at the end of May of this year, and running has once again been the mainstay of my daily routine ever since. I''m seriously running now. By seriously I mean thirty-six miles a week. In other words, six miles a day, six days a week. It would be better if I ran seven days, but I have to factor in rainy days, and days when work keeps me too busy. There are some days, too, when frankly I just feel too tired to run. Taking all this into account, I leave one day a week as a day off. So, at thirty-six miles per week, I cover 156 miles every month, which for me is my standard for serious running.In June I followed this plan exactly, running 156 miles on the nose. In July I increased the distance and covered 186 miles. I averaged six miles every day, without taking a single day off. I don''t mean I covered precisely six miles every day. If I ran nine miles one day, the next day I''d do only three. (At a jogging pace I generally can cover six miles in an hour.) For me this is most definitely running at a serious level. And since I came to Hawaii I''ve kept up this pace. It had been far too long since I''d been able to run these distances and keep up this kind of fixed schedule.There are several reasons why, at a certain point in my life, I stopped running seriously. First of all, my life has been getting busier, and free time is increasingly at a premium. When I was younger it wasn''t as if I had as much free time as I wanted, but at least I didn''t have as many miscellaneous chores as I do now. I don''t know why, but the older you get, the busier you become. Another reason is that I''ve gotten more interested in triathlons, rather than marathons. Triathlons, of course, involve swimming and cycling in addition to running. The running part isn''t a problem for me, but in order to master the other two legs of the event I had to devote a great deal of time to training in swimming and biking. I had to start over from scratch with swimming, relearning the correct form, learning the right biking techniques, and training the necessary muscles. All of this took time and effort, and as a result I had less time to devote to running.Probably the main reason, though, was that at a certain point I''d simply grown tired of it. I started running in the fall of 1982 and have been running since then for nearly twenty-three years. Over this period I''ve jogged almost every day, run in at least one marathon every year--twenty-three up till now--and participated in more long-distance races all around the world than I care to count. Long-distance running suits my personality, though, and of all the habits I''ve acquired over my lifetime I''d have to say this one has been the most helpful, the most meaningful. Running without a break for more than two decades has also made me stronger, both physically and emotionally.The thing is, I''m not much for team sports. That''s just the way I am. Whenever I play soccer or baseball--actually, since becoming an adult this is almost never--I never feel comfortable. Maybe it''s because I don''t have any brothers, but I could never get into the kind of games you play with others. I''m also not very good at-one-on-one sports like tennis. I enjoy squash, but generally when it comes to a game against someone, the competitive aspect makes me uncomfortable. And when it comes to martial arts, too, you can count me out.Don''t misunderstand me--I''m not totally uncompetitive. It''s just that for some reason I never cared all that much whether I beat others or lost to them. This sentiment remained pretty much unchanged after I grew up. It doesn''t matter what field you''re talking about--beating somebody else just doesn''t do it for me. I''m much more interested in whether I reach the goals that I set for myself, so in this sense long-distance running is the perfect fit for a mindset like mine.Marathon runners will understand what I mean. We don''t really care whether we beat any other particular runner. World-class runners, of course, want to outdo their closest rivals, but for your average, everyday runner, individual rivalry isn''t a major issue. I''m sure there are garden-variety runners whose desire to beat a particular rival spurs them on to train harder. But what happens if their rival, for whatever reason, drops out of the competition? Their motivation for running would disappear or at least diminish, and it''d be hard for them to remain runners for long.Most ordinary runners are motivated by an individual goal, more than anything: namely, a time they want to beat. As long as he can beat that time, a runner will feel he''s accomplished what he set out to do, and if he can''t, then he''ll feel he hasn''t. Even if he doesn''t break the time he''d hoped for, as long as he has the sense of satisfaction at having done his very best--and, possibly, having made some significant discovery about himself in the process--then that in itself is an accomplishment, a positive feeling he can carry over to the next race.The same can be said about my profession. In the novelist''s profession, as far as I''m concerned, there''s no such thing as winning or losing. Maybe numbers of copies sold, awards won, and critics'' praise serve as outward standards for accomplishment in literature, but none of them really matter. What''s crucial is whether your writing attains the standards you''ve set for yourself. Failure to reach that bar is not something you can easily explain away. When it comes to other people, you can always come up with a reasonable explanation, but you can''t fool yourself. In this sense, writing novels and running full marathons are very much alike. Basically a writer has a quiet, inner motivation, and doesn''t seek validation in the outwardly visible.For me, running is both exercise and a metaphor. Running day after day, piling up the races, bit by bit I raise the bar, and by clearing each level I elevate myself. At least that''s why I''ve put in the effort day after day: to raise my own level. I''m no great runner, by any means. I''m at an ordinary--or perhaps more like mediocre--level. But that''s not the point. The point is whether or not I improved over yesterday. In long-distance running the only opponent you have to beat is yourself, the way you used to be.Since my forties, though, this system of self-assessment has gradually changed. Simply put, I am no longer able to improve my time. I guess it''s inevitable, considering my age. At a certain age everybody reaches their physical peak. There are individual differences, but for the most part swimmers hit that watershed in their early twenties, boxers in their late twenties, and baseball players in their mid-thirties. It''s something everyone has to go through. Once I asked an ophthalmologist if anyone''s ever avoided getting farsighted when they got older. He laughed and said, "I''ve never met one yet." It''s the same thing. (Fortunately, the peak for artists varies considerably. Dostoyevsky, for instance, wrote two of his most profound novels, The Possessed and The Brothers Karamazov, in the last few years of his life before his death at age sixty. Domenico Scarlatti wrote 555 piano sonatas during his lifetime, most of them when he was between the ages of fifty-seven and sixty-two.)My peak as a runner came in my late forties. Before then I''d aimed at running a full marathon in three and a half hours, a pace of exactly one kilometer in five minutes, or one mile in eight. Sometimes I broke three and a half hours, sometimes not (more often not). Either way, I was able to steadily run a marathon in more or less that amount of time. Even when I thought I''d totally blown it, I''d still be in under three hours and forty minutes. Even if I hadn''t trained so much or wasn''t in the best of shape, exceeding four hours was inconceivable. Things continued at that stable plateau for a while, but before long they started to change. I''d train as much as before but found it increasingly hard to break three hours and forty minutes. It was taking me five and a half minutes to run one kilometer, and I was inching closer to the four-hour mark to finish a marathon. Frankly, this was a bit of a shock. What was going on here? I didn''t think it was because I was aging. In everyday life I never felt like I was getting physically weaker. But no matter how much I might deny it or try to ignore it, the numbers were retreating, step by step.Besides, as I said earlier, I''d become more interested in other sports such as triathlons and squash. Just running all the time couldn''t be good for me, I''d figured, deciding it would be better to add variety to my routine and develop a more all-around physical regimen. I hired a private swimming coach who started me off with the basics, and I learned how to swim faster and more smoothly than before. My muscles reacted to the new environment, and my physique began noticeably changing. Meanwhile, like the tide going out, my marathon times slowly but surely continued to slow. And I found I didn''t enjoy running as much as I used to. A steady fatigue opened up between me and the very notion of running.

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4.5 out of 54.5 out of 5
2,467 global ratings

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Top reviews from the United States

vcholakova
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Sexist, boring and an insult to anyone who considers themselves a runner
Reviewed in the United States on April 5, 2020
Reading the pages of this book makes me angry, bored and confused. SEXIST Every time the writer talks about a runner or a writer he uses masculine pronouns. The only times women are mentioned is when the author objectifies some Harvard female runners. While... See more
Reading the pages of this book makes me angry, bored and confused.

SEXIST
Every time the writer talks about a runner or a writer he uses masculine pronouns. The only times women are mentioned is when the author objectifies some Harvard female runners. While he''s busy talking about their "proud ponytails" and long strong legs, he doesn''t miss to say that "these girls probably don''t know as much as I do about pain".

NOT A RUNNER''S BOOK
This guy has no idea what he''s talking about. He has been running marathons for 25 years and his best time is around 3h30m?! You don''t have to run a 2h marathon to be a runner, but his practices are RIDICULOUS. I hope no one is reading this book to learn from this "runner". He just does long runs (almost) every day and that''s it - no thought in the training process, NOTHING! Not to mention that when he talks about his winter in Boston and the lack of opportunities to run due to the bad weather he says: "So we give up running and instead try to keep in shape by swimming in indoor pools, pedaling away on those worthless bicycling machines". This guy hasn''t heard of functional training or anything else but running. He only knows how to put on his Mizunos (beware of ads!) and jog for 1h+.

BORING WRITING
Repetitive, lots of back and forths, uneventful.
34 people found this helpful
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Stephanie
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I loved most of it
Reviewed in the United States on June 28, 2016
I’ve never read a Murakami novel before so I had no idea what to expect from his running memoir. I’d seen it on the bookshelf of a number of runners so as I started training for my first marathon a few weeks ago, I picked up the book as well. I loved most of it.... See more
I’ve never read a Murakami novel before so I had no idea what to expect from his running memoir. I’d seen it on the bookshelf of a number of runners so as I started training for my first marathon a few weeks ago, I picked up the book as well.

I loved most of it. I found his philosophy with both running and writing to be similar to mine. There are many things that someone who’s not an endurance athlete can’t understand so maybe this book speaks to a narrow audience. But I’m glad to be a member of that audience. I found myself nodding along. I’d read a free sample on my Kindle, then found a used paperback to buy so I could underline passages and make notes in the margin. I loved this book so much I penciled it up.

Now that I’ve seen this glimpse into his mind I want to try his novels, too.

I would not say this is “equal parts training log, travelogue, and reminiscence,” as the book description does. It includes all those things, but not in equal parts. It’s a series of essays that he wrote, mostly during his training for the 2005 New York City Marathon, but the memories take him to other races and other periods of his life, and on a whirlwind tour of his stomping grounds across Hawaii, Boston, Greece, and Japan.
43 people found this helpful
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Brian Jones
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Food For The Creative Professional Soul
Reviewed in the United States on March 9, 2014
I have this theory that goes like this: sometimes we find books, and sometimes books find us. Oftentimes I''ll pick up a book, read a few lines, and quickly close the covers. I''ll instinctively know that no matter how much I want to read it that that book''s... See more
I have this theory that goes like this: sometimes we find books, and sometimes books find us.

Oftentimes I''ll pick up a book, read a few lines, and quickly close the covers. I''ll instinctively know that no matter how much I want to read it that that book''s message was meant for a later time. And sure enough, years later, I''ll spot the book on the corner of my shelf and be moved to pick it up, only to find exactly what I needed to hear. It''s funny how life, and reading, works that way.

Other times I''ll find a book in the most random way - through a footnote or a random citation in an obscure periodical, for instance - and that book''s message will be exactly what I needed to hear at that moment in my life. That was certainly the case with Japanese novelist Karuki Murakami''s wonderful little book, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running.

While training for the New York City Marathon Japanese novelist Haruki Murakami decided to write about it as well. What materialized was a unique memoir that discusses his twin passions of writing and running, and the interesting way they nurture and inform each other.

I''ve been struggling as of late staying focused on the hard work of writing, so when I opened the book and read the following lines I knew that a message that I needed to hear had found me:

"One runner told of a mantra his older brother, also a runner, had taught him which he''s pondered ever since he began running. Here it is: Pain is inevitable. Suffering is optional. Say you''re running and you start to think, Man this hurts, I can''t take it anymore. The hurt part is an unavoidable reality, but whether or not you can stand any more is up to the runner himself. This pretty much sums up the most important aspect of marathon running."

If you feel called to creative work, and are struggling with finding the discipline necessary to create a body of work, you''ll find this playful, oftentimes philosophical memoir food for your soul.
37 people found this helpful
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OakCityBooks
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Quick Read
Reviewed in the United States on November 23, 2020
4 stars for What I Talk About When I Talk About Running by Haruki Murakami. Many people have raved about Haruki Murakami''s writings in the past. I must admit, I''ve never read anything else by him. I stumbled on this book when looking for books about running. And,... See more
4 stars for What I Talk About When I Talk About Running by Haruki Murakami.

Many people have raved about Haruki Murakami''s writings in the past. I must admit, I''ve never read anything else by him. I stumbled on this book when looking for books about running. And, I''m really glad that I did. Equal parts memoir and running and writing advice, I was able to finish this book in a day.

Haruki shares his experiences and calls out the parallels between running and writing. He talks about both writing and running chose him. Being a passionate reader and passionate runner, this book resonated with me. I gave it 4 stars because I think he could have dug a bit deeper. I felt he only skimmed the surface in relating how significant writing and reading are to his life and I found myself wanting to know more.

If you are a runner and a writer or a runner and a reader, I recommend this one.

#runnersread #greatread #memoir #haruki #murakami #lovetoread #lovetorun #runstagram #readstagram #4stars
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Evelynn Montalvo
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Feels like a conversation
Reviewed in the United States on April 24, 2020
I''m a big fan of Murakami, I''ve read 6 of his books before this one and I plan to read more. This book isn''t essential, definitely don''t begin with this book if you''ve never read Murakami. It drags sometimes, but it''s honest. It feels like you''re having a casual... See more
I''m a big fan of Murakami, I''ve read 6 of his books before this one and I plan to read more. This book isn''t essential, definitely don''t begin with this book if you''ve never read Murakami. It drags sometimes, but it''s honest. It feels like you''re having a casual conversation with him and that I did enjoy. He''s a great writer, but this is no masterpiece and this is not a must-read. Skip it if you''re on the fence about it, and leaning towards no.
He truly does talk about running through the whole thing.
I''m someone who makes notes and marks my books like crazy, but this was the kind of book I underlined sentences maybe ten times. It''s not profound, but it''s not horrible. I can''t say it was a total waste of time, but I''d prefer if I had devoted my time to a novel of his instead.
The book came in great condition.
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Amzn RvW
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A flowery ramble
Reviewed in the United States on May 13, 2020
I purchased this book at the recommendation of all the positive Amazon reviews. I was excited because I thought the concept was interesting by the title, but I just really don’t understand how this book has such glowing reviews. This isn’t a knock on the writer personally.... See more
I purchased this book at the recommendation of all the positive Amazon reviews. I was excited because I thought the concept was interesting by the title, but I just really don’t understand how this book has such glowing reviews. This isn’t a knock on the writer personally. He’s clearly a talented writer, but he uses running as a vehicle to convey his disjointed philosophies of life as a writer who splits his time between living in Hawaii, Cambridge Mass. It’s just not relatable on a personal level, and if you’re a hobby jogger trying to get more serious about running, the small amount of actual running advice is flat out bad. If you’re looking for a running book, this really isn’t it.
3 people found this helpful
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ArchaeoMag
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Very good memoir by a pleasant, respectable person
Reviewed in the United States on May 10, 2015
I really liked this book. It didn''t blow me out of the water with inspiration like I kind of expected, but that''s ok. It''s a memoir, not a manifesto. As a runner and writer myself, it was nice to see how the two mesh together for the author. I am anxious to read one of his... See more
I really liked this book. It didn''t blow me out of the water with inspiration like I kind of expected, but that''s ok. It''s a memoir, not a manifesto. As a runner and writer myself, it was nice to see how the two mesh together for the author. I am anxious to read one of his novels now after getting a glimpse of his writing style.
Aside from the joy of gaining insight from his decades of experience, I found the author to be respectable, humble, and generally just a likable guy. Id'' love to have coffee with him pick his brain some more. I found his humility and honesty refreshing and rare in a field where I am accustomed to sensationalized, horn-tooting tales of superatletes. I liked that he opened up about limits that come with aging, (though he''s still faster than I may ever be) and how the love of running can wax and wann over time. Humility is an aspect often left out when people talk about running, but I find that at times I leave for a run expecting to feel a great sense of accomplishment, and return humbled instead, and those runs are every bit as important. I am grateful that he touched on those feelings.
Running is such a metaphor for life, it only makes sense that a writer may be an avid runner. I often write in my head while I run, and I enjoyed this account of someone who has been doing both for decades.
13 people found this helpful
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Mariuxi
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Redundant
Reviewed in the United States on December 17, 2020
It''s an easy to read book, but it can be very redundant. You can get to know the mentality of Murakami on this book, and at times it may seem inspiring, and others can be dissapointing. He talks about life in the way he runs, and how endurance can be beneficial for... See more
It''s an easy to read book, but it can be very redundant. You can get to know the mentality of Murakami on this book, and at times it may seem inspiring, and others can be dissapointing. He talks about life in the way he runs, and how endurance can be beneficial for everything we do. He mentions that pain is unavoidable but how we react to pain is our choice. But as other reviewer mentioned, he does seem sexist in the way he talks about the female runners from Harvard University and their "proud pony tails." Another passage that was weird was when he ran in Greece; the original path of the Marathon. After he finished the run he mentioned that he was given flowers by someone who heard what he was just done (running the Marathon path) and Murakami states that "Foreigners" are nice people. HE is the foreigner in Greece and he calls the locals "foreigners?" Seems like the script from Japanese stereotypical behavior towards non-japanese. Overall not the best reading experience you can have.
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Top reviews from other countries

Kramer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Enjoyed this non fiction book.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 1, 2017
Another non fiction book by Murakami so dont expect a story.I was hoping for a biography/documentary type book by and on Haruki Murakami and he wrote this.I was unsure of it when i bought but i ended up loving it.I love the author but also wanted to start running so it was...See more
Another non fiction book by Murakami so dont expect a story.I was hoping for a biography/documentary type book by and on Haruki Murakami and he wrote this.I was unsure of it when i bought but i ended up loving it.I love the author but also wanted to start running so it was 2 birds one stone.I really enjoyed his routine, his diary like running and experiences in different countries.This is a must if you are thinking of running.He was after all 33 when he decided to start running and still does religiously at nearly 70!!Very inspirational to me.A great background into his running,some humour involved,albeit shorter than his fiction novels but perfect length although i didnt want it to end.Funny enough i did visualise what i was doing in the past when he mentioned preparing for famous past marathons. Overall it wont be to everyones taste but to me i enjoyed it, i just hope he releases an in depth book into his life. Highly recommend to the reader interested in the subject.
18 people found this helpful
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Tom Hayes
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Really nice, easy short read, even if you''re not interested in running.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 23, 2020
Murakami makes this book a super light, interesting memoir about personal development, discipline and progress - easy to get through in a couple of days at the most. I have no interest in running (though I did consider starting after reading this) and bought a copy for my...See more
Murakami makes this book a super light, interesting memoir about personal development, discipline and progress - easy to get through in a couple of days at the most. I have no interest in running (though I did consider starting after reading this) and bought a copy for my girlfriend who also has no interest in running, just because I loved it so much, and leant my copy to a colleague who I never got it back from! I need to get myself another copy I think!
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Easily Me
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A LITTLE SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 16, 2013
Yes, if you''ve ever read a Murakami story. Yes, if you ever lace up a pair of trainers and run to your own personal rhythm. Yes, if you''re interested in the art of the novel. Yes, if you''re none of those. You''ll find a friend in these pages. As you would expect from a...See more
Yes, if you''ve ever read a Murakami story. Yes, if you ever lace up a pair of trainers and run to your own personal rhythm. Yes, if you''re interested in the art of the novel. Yes, if you''re none of those. You''ll find a friend in these pages. As you would expect from a writer of his pedigree, a book about the activity he has pursued since 1982, running, is about much more that the non-runner/running-averse can get their teeth into. As the writer himself says in Chapter One: "running is both exercise and a metaphor." (p10) This philosophy is made apparent in the approach he has taken to writing and presenting this book, and he subsequently reveals much of his inner-self as reflected upon the choices he has made and those activities he has chosen to pursue. This is not a brash book revealing a brash personality boosted by the buzz of running. No, it''s a book about an individual constantly reinventing and fighting to find elements of a self that he is content to call his own. I think this is something we can all relate to, whatever lifestyle choices we make or have made. Of course, as a runner, a reader of Haruki and a bit of a word-doodler, you could say that this is a book tailored to me. Again, I think the book''s reach is far broader than that: as a reader, I enjoy opening my mind to experiences that lie beyond my own world, as you can only really be enlightened by that which you don''t already know or have realised. That''s not to say that this book, as I have already mentioned, doesn''t have any value for those to whom it appears to be made, such as me: far from it. Through reading the reflections of someone as perceptive as Murakami on issues we - well ''I'', for sure - have all wrestled with or experienced, you are able to smile at a metaphorical moment shared and/or be comforted by a familiar problem or obstacle surmounted. Yes, I guess, for me, the time with this book was like time spent with a good friend: we talked, we laughed, we consoled, we supported, and then we went home. It was all-too-brief and we haven''t changed the world, but the time we spent together was special and a great comfort to us both. And for those of you whose world of experience falls beyond that of Haruki, running and writing, you are, therefore, in a position to be enlightened, in some small way, about an aspect of each, which takes me back to what I enjoy about a book and, consequently, makes me think that you''d enjoy it, too. Which is a long-winded way of reiterating that I think there is something in this short book for everyone that, whilst not maybe world-changing, is life-affirming and entertaining, and isn''t that really enough to expect?
9 people found this helpful
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Sarugumo
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
What I talk about when I talk about running.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 24, 2009
`What I Talk About When I Talk About Running'' is a part running and part writing memoir from Haruki Murakami and although relatively short it kept me engrossed the whole way through. This follows Murakami as he talks about how he started running and how he trains for...See more
`What I Talk About When I Talk About Running'' is a part running and part writing memoir from Haruki Murakami and although relatively short it kept me engrossed the whole way through. This follows Murakami as he talks about how he started running and how he trains for various events. It also looks at how his running has affected his writing and how one often helps the other. It is made up of many short essays that follow on from one another and flow well chronologically and sit well together as a complete book. It is written in a deceptively simple way and although this has many short sentences, each one is expertly crafted and is describes what he is writing about perfectly. He also talks about his triathlon training which breaks up the book slightly and adds to the overall dynamic of the book. His tenacity whilst running ultra marathons is impressive and his resolves in maintaining his training schedule, come what may, should be an inspiration for those of us (I.e. all of us) runners who struggle to get out of the door sometimes. The part where he runs the Athens to Marathon route was especially good but to be honest this is packed full of many such stories to keep you reading and interested. I''d suggest you will enjoy this more if you run regularly, but that is in no way a prerequisite and you can enjoy this just as much if you are a couch potato. Well worth checking out. Feel free to check out my blog which can be found on my profile page.
8 people found this helpful
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yvonni
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Bought for a gift to my running buddy, read it already in greek!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 10, 2013
This product was bought as a gift for a friend who has participated in lots of half marathons and who motivates me to go out running. I have read it in Greek (gift from mum) and it was quite interesting to go into the mind of a frequent marathon runner! I have done a half...See more
This product was bought as a gift for a friend who has participated in lots of half marathons and who motivates me to go out running. I have read it in Greek (gift from mum) and it was quite interesting to go into the mind of a frequent marathon runner! I have done a half marathon and doing another one soon, maybe a full marathon in the future, gets more interesting towards the second half of the book. Would recommend to first time half marathon runners that want some idea of what it is all about. Interesting to find out how running affects your life and clears your mind, as well as contributing to travelling for races and socialising. Setting goals and accomplishing them....its all in your mind and mental strength. My friend said it was good and enjoyable to read. Put those shoes on, look up and keep smiling! Thanks
2 people found this helpful
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