high quality Loitering: high quality outlet online sale New and Collected Essays outlet sale

high quality Loitering: high quality outlet online sale New and Collected Essays outlet sale

high quality Loitering: high quality outlet online sale New and Collected Essays outlet sale
high quality Loitering: high quality outlet online sale New and Collected Essays outlet sale__front
high quality Loitering: high quality outlet online sale New and Collected Essays outlet sale__after

Description

Product Description

New York TimesNotable Books

Winner of the Washing State Book Prize

Finalist for the 2015 PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay

Charles D’Ambrosio’s essay collection Orphans spawned something of a cult following. In the decade since the tiny limited-edition volume sold out its print run, its devotees have pressed it upon their friends, students, and colleagues, only to find themselves begging for their copy’s safe return. For anyone familiar with D’Ambrosio’s writing, this enthusiasm should come as no surprise. His work is exacting and emotionally generous, often as funny as it is devastating. Loitering gathers those eleven original essays with new and previously uncollected work, so that a broader audience might discover one of our great living essayists. No matter his subject―Native American whaling, a Pentecostal “hell house,” Mary Kay Letourneau, the work of J.D. Salinger, or, most often, his own family―D’Ambrosio approaches each piece with a singular voice and point of view; each essay, while unique and surprising, is unmistakably his own.

Review

"

*Loitering makes NPR''s 2014 Best of the Year list
*Time Out New York names Loitering one of the Top Ten Books of the Year
*Loitering makes the Pacific Northwest Bestseller List
*Loitering shortlisted for the PNBA awards

"[W]e can see he is one of the strongest, smartest and most literate essayists practicing today. This, one would hope, is his moment. . . .These [essays] are highly polished, finished, exemplary performances."
Phillip Lopate, New York Times Book Review

"... Powerful... highlights D’Ambrosio’s ability to mine his personal history for painful truths about the frailty of family and the strange quest to understand oneself, and in turn, be understood."
Publishers Weekly, Starred Review

" Erudite essays that plumb the hearts of many contemporary darknesses."
Kirkus

"Important . . . one of the most profound essayists at work today."
Bookforum

"Loitering: New and Collected Essays should help position D’Ambrosio as one of the major essayists now working in the genre."
Los Angeles Review of Books

"[D''Ambrosio''s] toolkit, finite and familiar, is the English language, the same one ticker-taping through your conscious mind and mine, but with it he constructs sentences, paragraphs, entire pages of such sustained insight and fluency that you can’t help but feel a little fraudulent as a fellow user of the same mother tongue."
The L Magazine

"Loitering seems at heart an act of remembrance, a collection that grapples with the past in order to bring it to us still warm and pulsating. The brutality of D’Ambrosio’s nostalgia saves it from romanticism and instead transforms it into a deeply physical experience."
The Carolina Quarterly

"Loitering, by Charles D’Ambrosio, gets something deeply right about being uncertain, being in-between, being human. Its essays refuse the violence of imposing too much resolution on the world. This praise might sound abstract, but it’s more like a kind of closed-eye, clenched-fist gratitude: Thank you. These essays help me believe in what’s holy in the mess."
Leslie Jamison, New York Times

"D''Ambrosio hasn''t published anything less than brilliant, but Loitering is remarkable even by his standards."
Portland Mercury

"Throughout the collection, D''Ambrosio''s words conjure metaphorical ''thought light bulbs'' in the reader''s mind as he strikes feelings deep within ― about TV news reporters, whale conservation and the magic of trains ― all eloquently described in his rich, affecting prose."
The Inlander

"As a witness to human longing and delusion, D’Ambrosio is among our most eloquent voices. Reading Loitering I thought about David Foster Wallace a lot. D’Ambrosio is a different sort of writer: more personal, more openly haunted, preoccupied by the rites of Catholicism. But he shares with Foster Wallace a gift for exactitude, erudition, and moral concern. Both take an obvious delight in language as an instrument of truth―and perhaps more so as a weapon in the war against the American habit of falsehood."
The Daily Beast

"What I admired most about these essays is the way each one takes its own shape, never conforming to an expected narrative or feeling the need to answer all the questions housed within. D’Ambrosio allows his essays their ambivalence, and this gives ideas space to move freely across time..."
Hannah Gersen,, The Millions

" His writing is all guts and heart."
Esquire.com

" Every [essay] is a pleasure, diamond-cut and sharp in its incisive observations on how to be a human."
Flavorwire

" D’Ambrosio is a masterful writer. The essays are candid, playful, funny, and often wrenching."
Guernica

"Once you tune your brain into D’Ambrosio’s strange and beautiful frequency, you’ll find yourself searching for it the rest of your days. These are funny, ravishing, and deeply honest works of prose, marbled with lexical pleasures. That these legendary essays are finally available to a wide readership is cause for a national holiday."
Anthony Doerr, author of All the Light We Cannot See

"Charles D''Ambrosio''s essays are excitingly good. They are relevant in the way that makes you read them out loud, to anyone who happens to be around. Absolutely accessible and incredibly intelligent, his work is an astounding relief―as though someone is finally trying to puzzle all the disparate, desperate pieces of the world together again."
Jill Owens, Powell''s

" If you’re a fan of well-written essays, checking out this collection, which encompasses both D’Ambrosio’s earlier Orphans and work he’s completed since then, is a must. D’Ambrosio is equally good at channeling his own tortured family history and evoking the history of a place or work of literature."
Vol. 1 Brooklyn

About the Author

Charles D’Ambrosio is the author of two collections of short stories, The Point and The Dead Fish Museum, which was a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award, and the essay collection Orphans. He’s been the recipient of a Whiting Writer’s Award and a Lannan Fellowship, among other honors. His work has appeared frequently in The New Yorker, as well as in Tin House, The Paris Review, Zoetrope All-Story, and A Public Space. He teaches fiction at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop.

Product information

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Videos

Help others learn more about this product by uploading a video!
Upload video
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who bought this item also bought

Customer reviews

4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
52 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

R. M. PetersonTop Contributor: Poetry Books
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Life is messy and uncertain
Reviewed in the United States on January 14, 2015
A good book of essays is intellectually invigorating. The problem is there are so few of them. Add LOITERING to the short list. It contains seventeen essays that Charles D''Ambrosio has written over what appears to be about a twenty-year span. (It includes the eleven... See more
A good book of essays is intellectually invigorating. The problem is there are so few of them. Add LOITERING to the short list. It contains seventeen essays that Charles D''Ambrosio has written over what appears to be about a twenty-year span. (It includes the eleven essays from the limited edition cult classic, "Orphans", published in 2005.)

One principal aspect or recurring theme of the book concerns D''Ambrosio''s family: his grandfather, a Chicago bookie with connections to the mob; his father, a teacher of business finance, who gradually slipped the traces, gave all his money to the Catholic church, and died alone in a boarding house; his brother Danny, who committed suicide; and his other brother Mike, who cracked up his body badly when he (unsuccessfully) tried to kill himself by jumping off the Aurora Bridge in Seattle. The other prominent aspect of the book is captured by the word "loitering": D''Ambrosio on the periphery of events or situations observing and trying to make some sense of them. Life is messy and uncertain. What seems to most annoy D''Ambrosio are those who reduce it to certitudes and platitudes. In "By Way of a Preface" he writes, "What I''ve collected here, of course, are just a bunch of scrappy incondite essays, * * * but behind each piece, animating every attempt, is the echo of a precarious faith, that we are more intimately bound to one another by our kindred doubts than our brave conclusions."

Two of the essays -- "Loitering" and "Whaling Out West" -- are superb. (Only one piece was a clinker.) "Loitering" is an account of a SWAT team standoff in Seattle, where D''Ambrosio is an amateur reporter amidst all the vacuous pros. ("Another TV guy is practicing a look of grave concern in his monitor, a look that, live at least, seems woefully constipated.") In "Whaling Out West" D''Ambrosio reflects on the Pacific Northwest cause célèbre occasioned by the efforts of the "save the whale" environmentalists to stop the Makah Indians'' annual ritual whale kill. ("Eco-Elements on First Ave. downtown has been instrumental in gathering signatures for a petition against the Makah, and it''s one of those New Age emporiums with a syncretic, boutiquey approach to spirituality, a sort of travel agency specializing in tourism for the soul, emphasizing past lives, future lives, every kind of life but the really incompliant and unruly present * * *.") The subjects of other essays include a Russian orphanage, J.D. Salinger, Mary Kay Letourneau, and Richard Brautigan.

D''Ambrosio''s prose is intelligent, yet relaxed and informal. (It surely entailed considerable craftsmanship and polishing, but like all good prose there are no residual traces of that polishing.) There are numerous keen observations and perhaps even more striking apothegms. There is plenty of dark humor. Rounding out the package, the book itself, as published by Tin House Books, is well-made and attractive, with deckled edges, a handsome typeface, and a reader-friendly layout.
11 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
C. Nicholas Morrison
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Writer To Reckon With
Reviewed in the United States on November 11, 2014
Mr. D''Ambrosio is one of the finest writers alive. If you love perfect sentences backed up by an original mind, you need to read this guy. His output is slim--two volumes of short stories and these essays--but all the more precious for its relative scarcity.
10 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Melissa M. Shook
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Why loitering is so important...........
Reviewed in the United States on January 13, 2019
The title for the book is inventive and I took it out of the library where I teach an English as a Second Language class on Tuesday afternoons. I wasn''t wrong. The book is fascinating and it''s interesting to follow many threads in different directions toward varies... See more
The title for the book is inventive and I took it out of the library where I teach an English as a Second Language class on Tuesday afternoons. I wasn''t wrong. The book is fascinating and it''s interesting to follow many threads in different directions toward varies conclusions. I used several of the pieces to augment one I''d had them read from a magazine a few weeks earlier. Excellent. Thank you.....
Helpful
Report
Dwayne Ford
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Better have a dictionary handy
Reviewed in the United States on April 28, 2015
Grab a dictionary if you intent to make it through this book. More big words that I had never heard of, much less used in a sentence. I had to read it twice. Once without the dictionary - and again with it. The writing is top notch but it''s difficult for a layman to... See more
Grab a dictionary if you intent to make it through this book. More big words that I had never heard of, much less used in a sentence. I had to read it twice. Once without the dictionary - and again with it. The writing is top notch but it''s difficult for a layman to critique a literary critic''s work. This guy is a good writer.
3 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Ulysses616
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Truly stunning sentences, a wounded heart in each one
Reviewed in the United States on November 18, 2014
One of the best nonfiction collections I''ve ever read. D''Ambrosio''s every sentence is a weighty, burnished thing, but the prose rises above mere greatness--so much modern writing has a high degree of sentence-by-sentence polish and yet winds up feeling hollow or at any rate... See more
One of the best nonfiction collections I''ve ever read. D''Ambrosio''s every sentence is a weighty, burnished thing, but the prose rises above mere greatness--so much modern writing has a high degree of sentence-by-sentence polish and yet winds up feeling hollow or at any rate insubstantial. There is color and profundity in these essays, meticulous attention to the smallest sensory details and no shortage of the sorts of grand human wisdom nuggets thrown down by writers like Proust or David Foster Wallace. Each essay is wonderful, but my two favorites are the heartbreaking ones that concern his family, "This Is Living" and "Documents." His essay on Salinger is also one of the most perceptive things I''ve read about good old J.D. I can''t recommend this volume highly enough.
14 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Tracy A. Robert
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This is an astonishingly brilliant, original book
Reviewed in the United States on November 19, 2015
I''m looking at the reviews here and puzzled why there are not more. This is an astonishingly brilliant, original book, one that kept me rapt from the first to last word and then gave me hope for the intellectual empathy of the world. I keep it on a shelf with my enduring... See more
I''m looking at the reviews here and puzzled why there are not more. This is an astonishingly brilliant, original book, one that kept me rapt from the first to last word and then gave me hope for the intellectual empathy of the world. I keep it on a shelf with my enduring favorites, and it''s new. That is how good Loitering is. Buy this book. Please.
One person found this helpful
Helpful
Report
James E. Mcvoy
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Essay writing par excellence
Reviewed in the United States on May 3, 2017
Some of the best essays I have read in a long time. Good writing and a fresh perspective made for compelling reading. If you like essays, you need to read these.
Helpful
Report
MK
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
the trick that he''s using is a perfect combination of beautiful prose and pensive thoughts and insights ...
Reviewed in the United States on June 24, 2015
As others have pointed out, he is one of the foremost leading essayists of this generation. What really sets D''Ambrosio apart from the flock of other writers is his ability to grapple with areas of deep moralizing and philosophizing without losing the reader in the process.... See more
As others have pointed out, he is one of the foremost leading essayists of this generation. What really sets D''Ambrosio apart from the flock of other writers is his ability to grapple with areas of deep moralizing and philosophizing without losing the reader in the process. For me, the trick that he''s using is a perfect combination of beautiful prose and pensive thoughts and insights that make this meandering look relevant and pleasurable to discern. I am reading the book for a second time and I''m sure I''ll discover more.
5 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report

Top reviews from other countries

Tiger Single
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Decent read. Could do with some refinement and cohrence towards the end
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 27, 2018
This book started off well. I enjoyed his thoughts on a number of topics. My favourite being his take on sea shepherd and the public''s view of ocean conservation. Something which is close to my own interests. The theme of suicide comes up alot but seeing as this has shaped...See more
This book started off well. I enjoyed his thoughts on a number of topics. My favourite being his take on sea shepherd and the public''s view of ocean conservation. Something which is close to my own interests. The theme of suicide comes up alot but seeing as this has shaped much of his family life it is understandable. Despite this I feel he has a strong outlook on life even though he finds it a constant hurdle for his mind to grasp. However the book ended with the last few essays coming across as incoherent ramblings without any real meaning. I sort of could see where he was coming from but then id lose the thread again. He jumps around too much from thought to thought. Almost feels like he rushed the tail end of the book.
Report
L. MONKS
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
One of my favourite books of the last ten years
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 9, 2016
One of my favourite books of the last ten years, a brilliant collection of essays. Loitering has been described as a cult classic but is surely destined for outright classic status. Truly indispensable.
Report
N_Thorpe63
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Two Stars
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 17, 2016
Very densely and rather self consciously written.
Report
Ruth
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
people and their own life will love this. Physically too
Reviewed in India on February 5, 2016
True literature. People who read and are constant comtemplators, musing away in the secrecy of their thoughts about everything - observing the intricacies of relationships, places, people and their own life will love this. Physically too, this is a beautiful book :) If you...See more
True literature. People who read and are constant comtemplators, musing away in the secrecy of their thoughts about everything - observing the intricacies of relationships, places, people and their own life will love this. Physically too, this is a beautiful book :) If you own one, you will know what I mean.
Report
See all reviews
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who viewed this item also viewed

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?

high quality Loitering: high quality outlet online sale New and Collected Essays outlet sale

high quality Loitering: high quality outlet online sale New and Collected Essays outlet sale

high quality Loitering: high quality outlet online sale New and Collected Essays outlet sale

high quality Loitering: high quality outlet online sale New and Collected Essays outlet sale

high quality Loitering: high quality outlet online sale New and Collected Essays outlet sale

high quality Loitering: high quality outlet online sale New and Collected Essays outlet sale

high quality Loitering: high quality outlet online sale New and Collected Essays outlet sale

high quality Loitering: high quality outlet online sale New and Collected Essays outlet sale

high quality Loitering: high quality outlet online sale New and Collected Essays outlet sale

high quality Loitering: high quality outlet online sale New and Collected Essays outlet sale

high quality Loitering: high quality outlet online sale New and Collected Essays outlet sale

high quality Loitering: high quality outlet online sale New and Collected Essays outlet sale