new arrival Getting More: How new arrival You Can Negotiate to Succeed in Work lowest and Life outlet sale

new arrival Getting More: How new arrival You Can Negotiate to Succeed in Work lowest and Life outlet sale

new arrival Getting More: How new arrival You Can Negotiate to Succeed in Work lowest and Life outlet sale
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Description

Product Description

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • Learn the negotiation model used by Google to train employees worldwide, U.S. Special Ops to promote stability globally (“this stuff saves lives”), and families to forge better relationships.

A 20% discount on an item already on sale. A four-year-old willingly brushes his/her teeth and goes to bed. A vacationing couple gets on a flight that has left the gate. $5 million more for a small business; a billion dollars at a big one.
 
Based on thirty years of research among forty thousand people in sixty countries, Wharton Business School Professor and Pulitzer Prize winner Stuart Diamond shows in this unique and revolutionary book how  emotional intelligence, perceptions, cultural diversity and collaboration produce four times as much value as old-school, conflictive, power, leverage and logic.
 
As negotiations underlie every human encounter, this immediately-usable advice works in virtually any situation: kids, jobs, travel, shopping, business, politics, relationships, cultures, partners, competitors.
 
The tools are invisible until you first see them. Then they’re always there to solve your problems and meet your goals.

Review

“#1 Business Book to read for your career in 2011.”  Wall Street Journal FINS blog
 
“Phenomenal.” Lawyers Weekly
 
“Brilliant.” Lisa Oz, Oprah Network
 
“This book will give the reader a massive advantage in any negotiation.”  Stephanie Camp, Senior Digital Strategist, Microsoft.
 
“Superb…counterintuitive…immensely useful.” Kirkus starred review (new books)

" The Getting More Model is the negotiation model of choice for our CEO clients & staff of Financial Advisors.”
Morgan Stanley Smith Barney
 
The book is amazing . . . extremely powerful in the real world. A must read!” Adam Guren, Chief Investment Officer, First New York Securities
 
“I am living proof that this course does pay! I saved $245 million for my company.” Richard T.   Morena, CFO, Asbury Park Press, NJ
 
 “The most valuable tools in my 15 years in sales, marketing, and business development.” Sandeep Sawhney, Director of Business Development, The Weather Channel

“The best training we have ever received on this or any subject. The benefits are immediate and tangible.”   John Sobel, Senior Vice President/General Counsel, Yahoo

“I am one of Stuart Diamond’s biggest fans; he taught me more than anyone I can recall.” Rob McIntosh, Procurement Director, Dell
 
“The crown jewel; it fundamentally changed my way of thinking.” Ravi Radhakrishnan, Senior Manager, Accenture
 
“The best book I’ve read after the Bible.” Jeff Schultz, Health Benefits Advocate, MN
 
“This book can change the world.” Craig Silverman, Investment Advisor, NY
 
“After just a few chapters, I became a better parent.” Vivek Nadkarni, Technology Exec, CA
 
“Life changing.” Kerri Kuhn, Morrison & Foester Law Firm, CA
 
“Wow, it really works! This stuff is truly valuable.” Matthew Doyle, Director, The Strauss Group HR & Executive Recruitment Co., Buffalo, NY.
 
“Cannot put it down!” Michael Magee, Director, Development Finance Bank, UK
 
“The first book I’ve bought that has actually made me money.” Owen Devitt, Marketing Executive, Enterprise Ireland, Irish Government
 
"I am still amazed how much I learned." Sylvia Reul, Managing Partner, Reul Law Firm, Germany
 
“Definitely, this book is a MUST for everybody.” Katrina Agustin, Network Marketing Firm, Philippines
 
Stuart Diamond is the master of negotiation. Robin Khuda, Executive Director, NEXTDC (data centers) Ltd., Australia & New Zealand.
 
“I rely on Stuart Diamond’s negotiation tools every day.”  Christian Hernandez, Head of International Business Development, Facebook.
 
“Practical, immediately applicable and highly effective.” Evan Wittenberg, Chief Talent Officer, Hewlett-Packard
 
“A flexible toolkit for getting your way, whether…a million-dollar deal, a botched restaurant dish, or a petulant 4-year-old.”  Psychology Today
 
“Stuart Diamond equipped me with the tools to be more effective in all of life’s pursuits.” Larry B. Loftus, Head of Procter & Gamble Far East
 
“For women, empowering and enabling.”   Umber Ahmad, Exec Director, Platinum Gate Capital Management; former vice president, Goldman Sachs
 
“Invaluable in helping me achieve my goals, whether on the field, in the office, or at home with my five children.” Anthony Noto, CFO, National Football League
 
“There isn’t an hour that goes by in my personal and professional lives when I don’t use what I learned from you…”  Bill Ruhl, Director, National Customer Service Operations, Verizon

“Wonderful!” Laura Chavez, Host, ABC’s “Let’s Talk Live.”

About the Author

STUART DIAMOND is one of the world’s leading experts on negotiation. He has advised executives and managers from more than 200 of the Fortune 500 companies, and taught 30,000 people in 45 countries, from country leaders and professionals to homemakers and school children. A professor from practice at The Wharton School of business, where his course has been the most popular over 13 years, he has also taught at Harvard, Columbia, NYU, USC, Oxford and Berkeley, and advised the U.N. and the World Bank.  A former associate director of the Harvard Negotiation Project at Harvard Law School, he has managed a variety of business ventures, including technology, medical services, energy, agriculture, finance and aviation.
 
He holds a J.D. from Harvard Law School and an MBA from Wharton. Previously, Diamond was a Pulitzer Prize–winning reporter for the New York Times. His negotiation process solved the 2008 Hollywood Writers Strike, and has been selected by Google to train its 30,000 employees worldwide. Other clients include JP Morgan, Morgan Stanley, Microsoft and multiple companies in the healthcare field. He advised the top government leaders in Latvia in organizing their government after the fall of the Soviet Union, assisted Kuwait in rebuilding its government after the first Gulf War and advised the President and Foreign Minister of Nicaragua on more effective media and political strategies.
 
He also helps parents to get their young children to willingly brush their teeth and go to bed and shows employees and executives how to get better jobs and raises.
 
For more information, visit www.gettingmore.com

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

1

Thinking Differently

My run slowed to a jog as we approached the gate for our flight to Paris. The plane was still there, but the door to the Jetway was shut. The gate agents were quietly sorting tickets. They had already retracted the hood connecting the Jetway to the airplane door.

“Hi, we’re on this flight!” I panted.

“Sorry,” said the agent. “We’re done boarding.”

“But our connecting flight landed just ten minutes ago. They promised us they would call ahead to the gate.”

“Sorry, we can’t board anyone after they’ve closed the door.”

My boyfriend and I walked to the window in disbelief. Our long weekend was about to fall to pieces. The plane waited right before our eyes. The sun had set, and the pilots’ downturned faces were bathed in the glow of their instrument panel. The whine of the engines intensified and a guy with lighted batons sauntered onto the tarmac.

I thought for a few seconds. Then I led my boyfriend to the center of the window right in front of the cockpit. We stood there, in plain sight, my entire being focused on the pilot, hoping to catch his eye.

One of the pilots looked up. He saw us standing forlornly in the window. I looked him in the eye, plaintively, pleadingly. I let my bags slump by my feet. We stood there for what seemed an eternity. Finally, the pilot’s lips moved and the other pilot looked up. I caught his eye, as well, and he nodded.

The engine whine softened and we heard the gate agent’s phone ring. She turned to us, wide-eyed. “Grab your stuff!” she said. “The pilot said to let you on!” Our vacation restored, we clutched each other joyously, snatched our bags, waved to the pilots, and tumbled down the Jetway to our plane.

—rayenne chen, Wharton Business School, Class of 2001

The story above, told to me by a student in my negotiation course, was clearly an account of a negotiation. Completely nonverbal, to be sure. But it was done in a conscious, structured, and highly effective way. And it used six separate negotiation tools that I teach that are, in practice, invisible to almost everyone.

What are they? First, be dispassionate; emotion destroys negotiations. You must force yourself to be calm.

Second, prepare, even for five seconds. Collect your thoughts.

Third, find the decision-maker. Here, it was the pilot. There was not a second to waste on the gate agent, who was not about to change company policy.

Fourth, focus on your goals, not on who is right. It didn’t matter if the connecting airline was late, or wrong in not calling ahead to the gate. The goal was to get on the plane to Paris.

Fifth, make human contact. People are almost everything in a negotiation.

And finally, acknowledge the other party’s position and power, valuing them. If you do, they will often use their authority to help you achieve your goals.

These tools are often very subtle. But they are not magic. They helped this young couple in a way they will remember for a lifetime. And they help to bring about successful negotiations, day in and day out, for those who have learned these tools from my courses. From getting a job to getting a raise, from dealing with kids to dealing with colleagues, the kind of negotiation practiced here has given upwards of thirty thousand people more power and control over their lives.

My goal with this book is to re-create my course on the page, making it available to readers everywhere. It offers a set of strategies, models, and tools that together will change the way you view and conduct virtually every human interaction. These teachings are very different from what you have read or studied about negotiation. Based on psychology, they don’t depend on “win-win” or “win-lose.” They don’t depend on being a “hard” or “soft” bargainer. They don’t depend on a rational world, on who has the most power, or on phrases that make much of negotiation seem inaccessible and impractical. Instead, they are based on how people perceive, think, feel, and live in the real world. And they will help anyone do what this book suggests: get more.

And that’s one of those instinctive human desires, isn’t it? More. Whenever you do almost anything, don’t you wonder if there’s more? It doesn’t have to mean more for me and less for you. It just has to be, well, more. And it doesn’t necessarily mean more money. It means more of whatever you value: more money, more time, more food, more love, more travel, more responsibility, more basketball, more TV, more music.

This book is about more: how you define it, how you get it, how you keep it. Whoever you are, wherever you are, the ideas and tools in this book were meant for you.

The world is full of negotiation books telling you how to get to yes, get past no, win, gain an advantage, close the deal, get leverage, influence or persuade others, be nice, be tough, and so forth.

But of those who finish reading them, few can go out and do it. Besides, sometimes you may want to get to no. Or you want to get to maybe. Or you just want to delay things. But, instinctively, you always want to get more of what you want.

In Getting More, I present this information in such a way that you will actually be able to use it—immediately—whether ordering a pizza or negotiating a billion-dollar deal or asking for a discount on a blouse or a pair of pants. This is what people who take my course are required to do. I tell them to use the strategies the same day, write them down in their journals, practice them, and use them again.

WHY IS THIS SO IMPORTANT?

Negotiation is at the heart of human interaction. Every time people interact, there is negotiation going on: verbally or nonverbally, consciously or unconsciously. Driving, talking to your kids, doing errands. You can’t get away from it. You can only do it well or badly.

That doesn’t mean you have to actively negotiate everything in your life all the time. But it does mean that those who are more conscious of the interactions around them get more of what they want in life.

There is an old maxim about the difference between expert and nonexpert knowledge. A nonexpert looks at a field and sees flat land. An expert looks at the same field and sees small peaks and valleys. It takes no more time and energy for the expert to collect the greater amount of information from that landscape. But the expert can make much better use of that information to pursue opportunities or minimize risks.

What we are talking about in Getting More is learning better negotiation tools so that you become exquisitely more conscious of the topography of your dealings with others. The result will be a better life.

Like Rayenne Chen at the opening of the book, most of those who have taken my course are ordinary people. But they have learned to achieve extraordinary results by negotiating with greater confidence and skill. More than one woman from India in my class, using tools from the course, persuaded her parents to let her out of her own arranged marriage. My advice on the negotiation process helped to end the 2008 Writers Guild strike. It is the same kind of advice taught in my classes and outlined in Chapter 2.

A business student who hadn’t made it past the first-round interview with eighteen firms took the course, applied my negotiation tools, and got twelve consecutive final-round interviews and the job of his choice. Parents get their young children to brush their teeth without complaint.

We added up the money made and saved by students using these tools: $7 here, $132 there, $1 million or more in some cases. The total exceeded $3 billion for about a third of the stories we have collected. And that doesn’t count the marriages saved, the jobs obtained, the deals concluded, the parents who were persuaded to go to the doctor, the kids who did just what they were asked.

Most of the more than 400 anecdotes in this book use the actual names of the people involved. They will tell you how they got a raise, achieved satisfaction after buying defective merchandise, got out of a speeding ticket, got their kids to do their homework, closed a deal—how, in a million ways, their lives became better. How they got more.

For me and the tens of thousands of people I’ve taught, unless these tools work in real life, we’re not interested.

Who are these people? They come from all walks of life, and myriad cultures. Senior executives of billion-dollar companies, housewives, students in school, salespeople, administrative assistants, executives, managers, lawyers, engineers, stockbrokers, truckers, union workers, artists—you name it. And they come from around the world: the United States, Japan, China, Russia, Colombia, Bolivia, South Africa, Kuwait, Jordan, Israel, Germany, France, England, Brazil, India, Vietnam, and so forth.

These tools work for all of them. And they will work for you, too.

Like Ben Friedman, who almost always asks the companies whose services he uses if new customers are treated better than existing, loyal customers like himself—for example, with discounts or other promotions. By asking that question one day, Ben got 33 percent off his existing New York Times subscription.

Or Soo Jin Kim, who looks for connections everywhere. One day she saved $200 a year for her daughter’s after-school French program. How? Before asking for a discount, she made a human connection with the school’s manager, talking about her trips to France. These strategies will save you a little here, a little there. But it can add up to many thousands of dollars a year.

Some make millions at the start. Paul Thurman, a management consultant in New York, reduced a large client’s expenses by 35 percent, an “incredible” twenty points more than he had been able to do before the course. He used standards, persistence, better questions, relationships, and being incremental, as learned in the course. The first-year savings was $34 million; by now it’s over $300 million, he said. “I have a major advantage in the marketplace,” he said.

Richard Morena, then the chief financial officer of the Asbury Park Press, got $245 million more for the company in its sale, and $1 million more for himself, by using standards, framing, and other course tools. “I’ll keep practicing,” he said. To benefit from the strategies in the book, as Richard did, you have to think differently about how you deal with others.

HOW THIS BOOK IS DIFFERENT

What follow are the twelve major strategies that together make Getting More very different from what most people think negotiation is all about. These strategies will be expanded throughout the book, including the tools that support them and the perspectives that go with them. The strategies will be followed by chapters on how they are used in specific familiar applications, such as parenting, travel, and jobs.

To sum up, emotions and perceptions are far more important than power and logic in dealing with others. Finding, valuing, and understanding the picture in their heads produce four times as much value as conventional tools like leverage and “win-win” because (a) you have a better starting point for persuasion, (b) people are more willing to do things for you when you value them, no matter who they are, and (c) the world is mostly about emotions, not the logic of “win-win.”

The strategies together amount to a different way of thinking about negotiation. It’s the difference between saying “I play football” and “I play professional football.” The two are barely even the same game.

1. Goals Are Paramount.

Goals are what you want at the end of the negotiation that you don’t have at the beginning. Clearly, you should negotiate to meet your goals. Many, if not most, people take actions contrary to their goals because they are focused on something else. They get mad in a store or relationship. They attack the wrong people. In a negotiation, you should not pursue relationships, interests, win-win, or anything else just because you think it’s an effective tool. Anything you do in a negotiation should explicitly bring you closer to your goals for that particular negotiation. Otherwise, it is irrelevant or damaging to you. You need to ask, “Are my actions meeting my goals?”

2. It’s About Them.

You can’t persuade people of anything unless you know the pictures in their heads: their perceptions, sensibilities, needs, how they make commitments, whether they are trustworthy. Find out what third parties they respect and who can help you. How do they form relationships? Without this information, you won’t even know where to start. Think of yourself as the least important person in the negotiation. You must do role reversal, putting yourself in their shoes and trying to put them in yours. Using power or leverage can ultimately destroy relationships and cause retaliation. To be ultimately more effective (and persuasive), you have to get people to want to do things.

3. Make Emotional Payments.

The world is irrational. And the more important a negotiation is to an individual, the more irrational he or she often becomes: whether with world peace or a billion-dollar deal, or when your child wants an ice-cream cone. When people are irrational, they are emotional. When they are emotional, they can’t listen. When they can’t listen, they can’t be persuaded. So your words are useless, especially those arguments intended for rational or reasonable people, like “win-win.” You need to tap into the other person’s emotional psyche with empathy, apologies if necessary, by valuing them or offering them other things that get them to think more clearly.

4. Every Situation Is Different.

In a negotiation, there is no one-size-fits-all. Even having the same people on different days in the same negotiation can be a different situation. You must analyze every situation on its own. Averages, trends, statistics, or past problems don’t matter much if you want to get more today and tomorrow with the people in front of you. Blanket rules on how to negotiate with the Japanese or Muslims, or that state you should never make the first offer, are simply wrong. There are too many differences among people and situations to be so rigid in your thinking. The right answer to the statement “I hate you” is “Tell me more.” You learn what they are thinking or feeling, so that you can better persuade them.

5. Incremental Is Best.

People often fail because they ask for too much all at once. They take steps that are too big. This scares people, makes the negotiation seem riskier, and magnifies differences. Take small steps, whether you are trying for raises or treaties. Lead people from the pictures in their heads to your goals, from the familiar to the unfamiliar, a step at a time. If there is little trust, it’s even more important to be incremental. Test each step. If there are big differences between parties, move slowly toward each other, narrowing the gap incrementally.

6. Trade Things You Value Unequally.

All people value things unequally. First find out what each party cares and doesn’t care about, big and small, tangible and intangible, in the deal or outside the deal, rational and emotional. Then trade off items that one party values but the other party doesn’t. Trade holiday work for more vacation, TV time for more homework, a lower price for more referrals. This strategy is much broader than “interests” or “needs,” in that it uses all the experiences and synapses of people’s lives. And it greatly expands the pie, creating more opportunities, at home as well as the office. It is rarely done the way it should be.

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Customer reviews

4.6 out of 54.6 out of 5
796 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Absolutely Phenomenal - Practice and it Works Wonders
Reviewed in the United States on August 26, 2016
This book is for those willing to put in the time to practice, otherwise don''t bother. Since reading the book AND practicing the rules frequently I have had the following success: 1) Negotiated an entirely a free sweater 2) Negotiated a significant raise in... See more
This book is for those willing to put in the time to practice, otherwise don''t bother. Since reading the book AND practicing the rules frequently I have had the following success:

1) Negotiated an entirely a free sweater
2) Negotiated a significant raise in salary, equity, and signing bonuses
3) Improved relationships with my family in friends
4) Negotiated a free round of swimming with the dolphins

Why is this better than other negotiation books?
Simply put, most negotiation tactics focus on the short-term win i.e increase in salary at the expense of the relationship with the boss at the company. This isn''t a fantastic approach because it closes opportunities for future growth. Getting More teaches you to focus on the short-term AND long-term game, while still allowing you to effectively get what you desire.

How does it work?
Treat people like people. Understand the picture in their head. Negotiate calmly. It''s that simple.

Last word
You may not get what you want immediately, but I guarantee you''ll set yourself for future success. Like all things, you get what you put in.
31 people found this helpful
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Nick
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
an infomecial in print with war stories of MBA''s bullying people in the service industry
Reviewed in the United States on February 15, 2021
I stopped reading this book after about ~150 pages. Here are my issues: 1. The first ~60 pages read like a long winded advertisement with self-aggrandizing "success" stories from the author''s MBA students (Did he mention that he teaches elite MBA students? Don''t... See more
I stopped reading this book after about ~150 pages. Here are my issues:

1. The first ~60 pages read like a long winded advertisement with self-aggrandizing "success" stories from the author''s MBA students (Did he mention that he teaches elite MBA students? Don''t worry, you''ll be reminded). A few sporadic paragraphs of useful material, but not worth wading through.

2. I am new to ''business'' books, but it is alarming to see the lack of citations for studies and facts discussed. Here is one example (many more in the first 100 pages) from the chapter "Hard Barginers and Standards": "Studies have shown that one person will be much more persuasive than another with the exact same facts because of framing." Cool, what study said that? I don''t see a footnote. He goes on to discuss another study in detail, again with no citation. How is this acceptable? The lack of scholarly effort even when he (rarely) tries to back up his ideas with more than "user testimonials" strikes me as lazy at best.

3. It is very clear that the author is extremely out of touch with reality outside of the ivy MBA world he inhabits. For example, one of the tenants of the book (that I agreed with) was that you shouldn''t use power to bully or intimidate people into agreeing with you because it won''t work and makes people resent you. Here is a (paraphrased) example from the chapter "Hard Barginers and Standards" where he describes bullying without realizing it:

A MBA student (did he mention he teaches *elite* MBA students?) is at a restaurant and his drink comes very late, (after his food arrives, if you can believe it!). The student has taken the author''s negotiating class, so he knows just what to do. He asks the waitress: "Do you think drinks should arrive before food?" and then goes on to berate and belittle her with similar condescending questions until, after some protest, she takes the drink off the bill.
Success! Then one of the MBA student''s friends tells him that at this restaurant, she probably had to pay for that drink with her own money. The MBA student then does the honorable thing and pays for the drink. But he is aghast at how successful and powerful the method is! He convinced a waitress to pay for his drink with her own money!!! Great power, great responsibility!
-end-

Give me a break. He just described a situation where an ivy league MBA student (read: has 40K+ per year to blow on a master''s degree) bullied a waitress into buying him a drink. I''ve worked in the service industry. In this situation, the waitress had to choose between possibly losing her low paying, difficult job because a whiny entitled MBA student was probably going to complain to her boss, or buying said whiny entitled MBA student a drink. That''s not negotiating, that is the grossest form of elitist bullying I''ve ever seen described. The fact that the author (and his student) couldn''t see that, should tell you everything that you need to know about them.

I am shocked by the positive reviews of this book. I bought it after it was highly recommended over similar books. I hope this does not reflect a standard in "business" writing, because I am fast losing the respect I had for this field.
5 people found this helpful
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Andrey Norin
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This is one of the best books on improving the quality of your life you can read.
Reviewed in the United States on August 19, 2015
This book is a manual on "Getting More" from all aspects of your life. I have been studying this book a few pages at a time during every morning commute, trying really hard to internalize the principles over the past few months. This book is not meant to be read,... See more
This book is a manual on "Getting More" from all aspects of your life. I have been studying this book a few pages at a time during every morning commute, trying really hard to internalize the principles over the past few months. This book is not meant to be read, it''s meant to be studied and reflected upon.

You must ask yourself at the end of each day - "Which of the Getting More principles have I applied today?"

"Was I being incremental?"
"Did I focus on the pictures in their heads?"
"Was I able to frame or "package" the facts to achieve a certain result?"
"Was I focused on my goals?"
"Was I talking to someone who can really help me?"

Etc....

This book gave my emotional and social intelligence a huge boost. If you''re a very street-smart person, you may find that you already know most of this stuff. If that''s the case you''re not the target audience. I didn''t grow up surrounded by very savvy individuals, so for me this book has been a godsend.

PS: I own both a Paperback and a Kindle version that I carry with me on my iPad everywhere I go.
17 people found this helpful
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EZ
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Must Read
Reviewed in the United States on August 9, 2012
In the Spring 2011 semester in my LL.M. education in University of Pennsylvania Law School, I was able to get into the Negotiation class of Professor Diamond. The class taught by Prof. Diamond is at least as hard to be enrolled as to be admitted to Penn Law. Believe it or... See more
In the Spring 2011 semester in my LL.M. education in University of Pennsylvania Law School, I was able to get into the Negotiation class of Professor Diamond. The class taught by Prof. Diamond is at least as hard to be enrolled as to be admitted to Penn Law. Believe it or not, it is probably the only class which has longer waitlist then its capacity (42 people). There are two possible reasons for a class to be so famous; either it is an easy "A" class which it is not, or the professor and/or class is something beyond ordinary.
From the very first meeting of our class, I was surprised that a class can be so entertaining and helpful. I have been studying law for longer than a decade including LL.B. (JD equivalent), LL.M. (master''s), lawyering education ( 1 year mandatory education upon graduation of Law School to be an attorney at law), and am currently in my SJD(PhD education), and the class is much better than other classes in many ways.
1. You learn information which you see actually use.
2. You see the benefits, both in monetary terms and other ways from the very first class
3. The information given is not a collection of clichés but they come from real life experiences.
4. It is very entertaining, that you do not believe you are still in the law school 
Now you can think that "what these have to do with the book?"
Well, let me explain:
1. Getting More is the book assigned for students to read.
2. It has almost the same information you will get in class by attending UPENN.
3. The book gives you all the 4 benefits I have enumerated in prior paragraph.
In addition, the book is not a collection of theories. Every single idea in the book is supported by the examples from real life. The book also supplies examples of failures, and shows what was done wrong and why did not the strategy work. The examples are not made up case scenarios, or imaginations of the author, they are the examples which have happened to the author, or most of the time, to his students.
I have learned a lot from Professor Diamond in person, and from his book, and thanks to the lessons thought by him I had great benefits. I saved thousands of dollars from various events (transportation, cable TV&Internet, my new car, my monthly rent etc). Last time I saw the monetary benefits was two weeks ago, which is why I decided to write about the book. I got 4 Michelin tires (I was quoted $800,) for $480. Yet this is not the best part. By using the techniques, I almost always get what I want, even more of it. I got same day appointments from doctors and dentists, my late applications are accepted by schools, my friends started to join my ideas more often than before.
If you read the book, you will learn all the ideas; however if you want to have all the benefits, you should use them. Like we used to do in class, I would suggest you to read a chapter/week and try to use them throughout the week. After a few weeks, try to combine ideas (for instance ideas from ch1,ch2,ch3) in a single occasion.
I have send this book to couple of friends, by think that "I will pay ~$15, and give them a chance to earn thousands".
There is one thing better than the book, which is to get into Professor Diamond''s class. As long as this is not an option, I would suggest you not to hesitate a second to buy the book. Did I mention that the author is a Pulitzer winner, which I believe he did not negotiate for it 
Once you read it, I believe you will send Getting More to your friends. A gift, from a gifted author ;)

Note: Had to delete and repost my original review due to a rude comment.
23 people found this helpful
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Judge J Drhedd
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
One of the best nego books out there
Reviewed in the United States on February 21, 2014
There are tones of pompousness on some chapters, indeed, especially on passages advocating the method over std texts on nego by Fisher, et al (like getting to yes and getting past no). But I figured it would be less-exciting writing if the author chose to be more modest... See more
There are tones of pompousness on some chapters, indeed, especially on passages advocating the method over std texts on nego by Fisher, et al (like getting to yes and getting past no). But I figured it would be less-exciting writing if the author chose to be more modest everywhere in the book. Anyway, I suggest you just let this bit of arrogance pass and focus on the methods and tools being suggested and how exactly they were implemented in the real-life cases. Retention would be better this way.

Also, this is the most dense book on nego that i got my hands on. This would have been close to 500 pages if the small fonts are made standard-sized. And Im only half way into it. But I immediately see that the approach being proposed here is a non-repeat/non-rehash of other nego books. Diamond proposes a truly different approach. I hope to implement some of the tools profitably.
10 people found this helpful
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E. Fisher
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Useful, But Needs A New Edition
Reviewed in the United States on December 25, 2012
As a professional negotiator, I found Professor Diamond''s book very useful in providing a framework for organizing commonly used tools in negotiations (setting goals, preparing, making lists, empathizing, exchanging items of unequal value-to name a few). He suggests a... See more
As a professional negotiator, I found Professor Diamond''s book very useful in providing a framework for organizing commonly used tools in negotiations (setting goals, preparing, making lists, empathizing, exchanging items of unequal value-to name a few). He suggests a quadrant or 12 step method which I find good in disciplining my mind as a checklist when negotiating different items. Diamond stresses empathy (which he calls "seeing the picture in the other side''s mind") and valuing as key elements for a successful negotiation. In order to successfully fulfill these functions, one must prepare and get to know the other party.
Diamond uses numerous examples to emphasize the elements of his system to generally good effect. The writing style is also engaging while maintaining a professional tone.

However, this book is desperately in need of editing and there are points where the author reveals a distracting amount of egotism. The most glaring example is when he discusses a transaction and writes "even my assistant" could do the math. Diamond should think about the picture in the assistant''s mind of his or her value to him after this comment before he put it into writing. Additionally, there is the incessant name dropping and stating what people have become. Often times this comes off as attributing their success in life primarily or exclusively to his system. Diamond also repeatedly tells the reader what "Getting More" will do for them throughout the book. This constant reminding is superfluous and should be deleted. Finally, the book repeats itself with certain stories and quotes, Reagan''s "Trust, but verify" is repeated twice.

Overall, I highly recommend the book because, when it is at its best (the first 170 pages) it provides a useful tool in both personal and professional situations. The last 200 pages diminish a bit the strong beginning.
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William
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Must Have book
Reviewed in the United States on January 5, 2019
This book is seriously helpful regarding getting what you want in all aspects (regarding human interactions.) Before reading this, I felt these tactics were just social engineering but now I use these all the time. It is great for how to speak to people and how to best word... See more
This book is seriously helpful regarding getting what you want in all aspects (regarding human interactions.) Before reading this, I felt these tactics were just social engineering but now I use these all the time. It is great for how to speak to people and how to best word things to help situations go your way.
I now go into places and conversations with what I want already in my mind. I plan out the interaction before it even starts.
You can use this at work, with kids, with anyone.
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J.M.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Getting more accomplished more often.
Reviewed in the United States on November 14, 2011
When negotiating -- Do you want to be right or be persuasive? Do you want to win or to meet your goals? Do the goals justify the means? How do you deal with someone who has more power or is being a bully? How do you deal with someone who is weaker? "Getting More"... See more
When negotiating -- Do you want to be right or be persuasive? Do you want to win or to meet your goals? Do the goals justify the means? How do you deal with someone who has more power or is being a bully? How do you deal with someone who is weaker? "Getting More" attempts to help you address these issues for yourself.

Initially I was reluctant to read this book because it was presented to me as collection of underhanded manipulation techniques. At least the first story in it appears to be manipulative, but as I read further on, I realized that this is the best book on interpersonal communication and negotiation I have come across. What makes this book so different is that it successfully combines best ideas found in books on (1) negotiation, (2) social psychology, (3) personal growth. The concepts are based on common sense, requiring conscious effort and practice. There are no tricks. Recently, I was able to get a two day request done on the spot in five minutes without having to plead or threaten.

The main idea is to recognize the fact that most of the time you can''t force your will on others and if you do, it will be only be a momentary advantage with some form of retribution to follow in the future. It will always be very expensive. An extreme case would be a psychopath always finding a new victim. Dictators fall into that category. If you are not one of those, you will find that persuading a person to willingly cooperate will get better results for both, even in situations where you don''t like or trust each other. For many, it may sound counterintuitive since we are often taught that competition is the principle rule of nature, i.e. it is survival of the fittest. We instinctively feel that to get anything, to achieve, one has to struggle to win, lose, or draw. The author repeatedly makes a point that this frame of mind generally results in poor outcomes, especially when the two parties have repeated interactions.

One memorable quote was "Life is not a sports game. In sports, it is expected that one side will lose". I would replace "is not" with "doesn''t have to" because competition is as much a part of life as cooperation. Some examples provided in the book describe situations where an effort to cooperate has an implicit competitive agenda. For example, satisfying mutual interests in an interview, or a business transaction, in effect locks out a `silent'' third candidate. The advantage a person can have over another candidate is simply being a better communicator. That in itself is viewed as the greatest asset in variety of partnerships.

So how does one get an adversary to cooperate? Just as with "How does one get to Carnegie Hall?" it is "Practice, practice, practice".

For example, you have to become perceptive of the other person''s state of mind, their needs and obligations. An individual often will become more receptive if he or she feels being heard and understood and not just being talked to. Some people a born with such skill but all can improve it thru every day casual interactions. The key is not to be lazy. People will cooperate simply because you show them respect or bring in a third party they obliged to respect, or recognize and empathize about an unrelated troubling issue. Another way of getting someone to work with you is to present the problem in a form of a fair trade, a deal, instead of a tug of war. Items to be traded many not even be on the negotiating table at the start and need to be discovered in the process.

The book covers examples on dealing with negotiation "bullies" by pinning them against their own standards. People with lots of leverage often have to oblige some higher authority or standards, and even their own standards to appear to be consistent. On the other hand, the book warns not to use power carelessly. Because the techniques discussed can be can be misused, the author often warns to be prudent, just as one should be with a sharp knife. He defines manipulation as an action that at some point makes a person feel cheated or abused.

There are cases where using these methods would be very challenging because they would require changing the `game'' or breaking old habits. For example, the primary purpose of a political debate is to come up with the winner, not to solve an issue. Even when the winner is chosen, he or she must continue to wrestle with the opposition to maintain control. The `war'' process is continuous and hence there is no time or room for constructive negotiations that would produce solutions. On a personal level, a couple going through a bitter divorce would rather strangle each other than try to empathize. In such contentious cases, to secure a `win'', the opposing sides escalate by building up their armies with supporters, lawyers, and advisers. It often becomes a bitter and expensive war of attrition.
The only hope of utilizing the concepts in the book in such cases is introduction a skillful mediating neutral third party. There are over a million lawyers in US. How many of them provide non-partisan negotiation services?

This book is only as effective as your sphere of influence, which includes your family, friends, neighbors, colleagues, and anyone you directly interact with. The premise is not to `take more'' from others. It is `getting more'' needs satisfied by both parties in a fair trade, and `get more'' accomplished in your life.
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D. Hetherington
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good ideas explained very badly.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 20, 2012
I bought this book after reading a lengthy newspaper article based on an interview with the author. His approach to negotiating appeared far more intelligent and perceptive than other authors on the subject. Unfortunately, within a chapter or so of this book it had already...See more
I bought this book after reading a lengthy newspaper article based on an interview with the author. His approach to negotiating appeared far more intelligent and perceptive than other authors on the subject. Unfortunately, within a chapter or so of this book it had already become clear that 80% of the information and ideas it contains were present in the original 1000-word interview. So essentially, this book is an excellent 2000-word essay inflated to a nauseating 80000-word paperback through endless repetition. The book is saturated with "real-life examples" from students that he has taught. Examples might conceivably be useful as a means of exploring his ideas in greater depth if they were deconstructed, or used as a means to analyse subtle mistakes in negotiation. But they don''t -- they are all superficial, happy-ending retellings of the same storyline: "I had this student once, they used my ideas brilliantly in some negotiation, and now they are rich and happy!". These intrude constantly on the narrative, so that after the first half-dozen, it feels as though the programme is interrupted every five minutes by yet another commercial for a product I have already paid for. Presumably Stuart Diamond fell victim to the familiar publisher''s belief that customers think that 2000 words repeated 40 times is worth 40 times more, and that everything has to be crammed into a familiar, fashionable format. Indeed, traces of the publisher''s interference are regularly evident, which is never a good sign. For instance, Diamond states, more than once (as with everything else he states) that the book is called "Getting More" not "Getting Everything" because it is central to his approach that one should do what they can to improve their chances of a successful negotiation, but accept that they cannot succeed in every instance. So what did his publishers choose to add as a subtitle? "Get what you want every time." It''s as if they hadn''t read the actual book -- and maybe they haven''t.
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Den Lee
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Overlong and Repetitive
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 6, 2014
This book has some useful points and a slightly different approach to negotiation, being less technical than most others with little talk of BATNA''s, leverage and the like. On a less positive note its use of emotional triggers and validating the other person by forming a...See more
This book has some useful points and a slightly different approach to negotiation, being less technical than most others with little talk of BATNA''s, leverage and the like. On a less positive note its use of emotional triggers and validating the other person by forming a personal connection felt shallow and manipulative at times. For example talking about football or children with low paid restaurant staff in order to get a discount on a meal! These anecdotes were usually topped off with the mostly irrelevent detail that the person involved was a vice president, top executive or consultant of some big company or other, to give the whole story (and the author) some credibility (e.g. an example of a homeless person negotiating a job, free meal or room in a hotel would have been far more impressive and inspiring). Other than that the whole thing seems at least a hundred pages too long, descending into repeated often irrelevent and unecessary stories of negotiation successes, based on use of the tools in the book, although most of them seem like common sense, and many people would use them without thinking. This book could have been a heck of a lot shorter, less smug and rambling. On a positive note, it is a timely reminder that people should treat each other with respect and decency when things get rough no matter where you are, and its usually better to observe than talk, and for that reason it is worth a browse. The parts on reframing and the use of standards will come in handy the next time you feel a call to Customer Services coming on and your bloods boiling. Just don''t waste the time of busy restaurant staff pretending you are interested in their kids or favourite sport just to get a small discount on a meal. One final point: Any book that seriously quotes the phrase "humanely slaughtered cows" to get around a vegetarian should get 5 stars for a lack of irony.
3 people found this helpful
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I. Salem
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Very good
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 4, 2020
The only book to read about negotiation
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Amazon Customer
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great content (poorish) cover
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 7, 2020
The content is great but the cover is poor quality. The book cover peels off slowly the more you read and hold it the more it weakens. I''d suggest to wrap it in bed you start to read it to protect the original front and back. Great book to read and I learnt a lot from it.See more
The content is great but the cover is poor quality. The book cover peels off slowly the more you read and hold it the more it weakens. I''d suggest to wrap it in bed you start to read it to protect the original front and back. Great book to read and I learnt a lot from it.
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M Tuncer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Practical guide
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 16, 2017
Easy to read, lots of real life examples, and very practical application tips for negotiation techniques
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new arrival Getting More: How new arrival You Can Negotiate to Succeed in Work lowest and Life outlet sale

new arrival Getting More: How new arrival You Can Negotiate to Succeed in Work lowest and Life outlet sale

new arrival Getting More: How new arrival You Can Negotiate to Succeed in Work lowest and Life outlet sale

new arrival Getting More: How new arrival You Can Negotiate to Succeed in Work lowest and Life outlet sale

new arrival Getting More: How new arrival You Can Negotiate to Succeed in Work lowest and Life outlet sale

new arrival Getting More: How new arrival You Can Negotiate to Succeed in Work lowest and Life outlet sale

new arrival Getting More: How new arrival You Can Negotiate to Succeed in Work lowest and Life outlet sale

new arrival Getting More: How new arrival You Can Negotiate to Succeed in Work lowest and Life outlet sale

new arrival Getting More: How new arrival You Can Negotiate to Succeed in Work lowest and Life outlet sale

new arrival Getting More: How new arrival You Can Negotiate to Succeed in Work lowest and Life outlet sale

new arrival Getting More: How new arrival You Can Negotiate to Succeed in Work lowest and Life outlet sale

new arrival Getting More: How new arrival You Can Negotiate to Succeed in Work lowest and Life outlet sale

new arrival Getting More: How new arrival You Can Negotiate to Succeed in Work lowest and Life outlet sale

new arrival Getting More: How new arrival You Can Negotiate to Succeed in Work lowest and Life outlet sale

new arrival Getting More: How new arrival You Can Negotiate to Succeed in Work lowest and Life outlet sale

new arrival Getting More: How new arrival You Can Negotiate to Succeed in Work lowest and Life outlet sale

new arrival Getting More: How new arrival You Can Negotiate to Succeed in Work lowest and Life outlet sale

new arrival Getting More: How new arrival You Can Negotiate to Succeed in Work lowest and Life outlet sale

new arrival Getting More: How new arrival You Can Negotiate to Succeed in Work lowest and Life outlet sale

new arrival Getting More: How new arrival You Can Negotiate to Succeed in Work lowest and Life outlet sale

new arrival Getting More: How new arrival You Can Negotiate to Succeed in Work lowest and Life outlet sale

new arrival Getting More: How new arrival You Can Negotiate to Succeed in Work lowest and Life outlet sale

new arrival Getting More: How new arrival You Can Negotiate to Succeed in Work lowest and Life outlet sale

new arrival Getting More: How new arrival You Can Negotiate to Succeed in Work lowest and Life outlet sale

new arrival Getting More: How new arrival You Can Negotiate to Succeed in Work lowest and Life outlet sale

new arrival Getting More: How new arrival You Can Negotiate to Succeed in Work lowest and Life outlet sale

new arrival Getting More: How new arrival You Can Negotiate to Succeed in Work lowest and Life outlet sale

new arrival Getting More: How new arrival You Can Negotiate to Succeed in Work lowest and Life outlet sale