popular Dungeons & Dragons Monster Manual 2021 (Core Rulebook, D&D Roleplaying lowest Game) online sale

popular Dungeons & Dragons Monster Manual 2021 (Core Rulebook, D&D Roleplaying lowest Game) online sale

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Description

Fill your Dungeons & Dragons games with deadly monsters from the Monster Manual.

The Monster Manual teaches you how to how to fill your Dungeons & Dragons games with monsters—how to populate the game with pesky goblins and mighty dragons for players to battle or beguile, outwit or outrun.

Inside the Monster Manual you’ll find more than 150 classic D&D creatures, with vivid illustrations and rich descriptions to help breathe life into your zombies and liches.

“… What if I told you about the best book of monsters ever? The 5E Monster Manual just might be the one...” Ed Grabianowski, io9.Gizmodo.com

D&D acolytes are everywhere...Tech workers from Silicon Valley to Brooklyn have long-running campaigns, and the showrunners and the novelist behind ‘Game of Thrones’ have all been Dungeon Masters.”—Neima Jahromi, The New Yorker

• The Monster Manual is one of the three main Dungeons & Dragons books, along with the Player’s Handbook and the Dungeon Master’s Guide. It’s an essential resource for Dungeon Masters to use in populating any type of challenge they might contrive for their players.

• From an angel’s wingspan to the vacant eyes of a zombie beholder, the Monster Manual includes more than 150 creatures illustrated in vivid color, with more than 400 quick reference tables to help you bring them to life with ease.

• Rich descriptions of each monster help trigger your imagination. From the familiar (“vampires hate sunlight”) to the arcane (“what color is the vapor from a gorgon’s nose?”), the Monster Manual helps inspire your decisions and keep the game flowing smoothly.

• In Dungeons & Dragons, you and your friends coauthor your own legend. Guided by a Dungeon Master, you create characters and play their roles in a story, rolling dice and navigating maps as you unfold a tale as limitless as your imagination.

• Dungeons & Dragons is the world’s greatest roleplaying game. Created in 1974, D&D transformed gaming culture by blending traditional fantasy with miniatures and wargaming.

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Customer reviews

4.9 out of 54.9 out of 5
19,927 global ratings

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Top reviews from the United States

Albert Lamm
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Best price ever and the second most important core book you’ll ever buy.
Reviewed in the United States on December 13, 2018
All six books, all three core, all three bad game supplements are on sale right now for about 20 bucks each on amazon this month, absolutely worth the price of admission! Now you could, like I, solely use apps like Fantasy Grounds (Steam client) and or free PDFs,... See more
All six books, all three core, all three bad game supplements are on sale right now for about 20 bucks each on amazon this month, absolutely worth the price of admission!

Now you could, like I, solely use apps like Fantasy Grounds (Steam client) and or free PDFs, But nothing replaces the feeling and ease of use of having physical copies of each guide in hand. Plus as a fun bonus they looks stunning in my bookshelf. Make you look even more professional as a DM in person. Lastly, all six together give you an extreme launching pad for designing, running and modifying premade or homemade campaigns!

For 20 a pop, what is normally a $300 purchase turns into a $120 steal, never will you ever get a better deal on these books brand new.

My only regret was getting the one book I did have before this sale but ce n''est pas grave.

Now onto the book itself, arguably the second most important core book. You see... I didn’t realize when I first went looking for which books to get that the Players Handbook is the single most important first purchase. So instead, wanting to DM, I bought the corespondent book. Makes sense on the surface until you realize what the Dungeon Master Guide vs the Player’s Handbook do. The DMG only lays out how campaigns work, chart after chart of rollable ideas (with dice, of course!) for what your campaign will and could become. But what it does not do, is actually teach you the core rule set of how to play the game. Only the Player’s Handbook does that. So, with literally 15+ campaign idea books out there (this is beyond the three core and the three core supplement books as seen above) you only really need the Player’s Handbook, a campaign guide (one you made yourself, got from someone else or bought partially premade) and finally the Monster Manual!

Here not only do you get the base games 150 premade creatures and beasties, but suggestions on rating levels of your parties composition so that you don’t make fights too hard or too easy based on what your trying to actually do here.

My favorite part though is all the lore on species types or curses and so on, plus a detailed breakdown of each one, their abilities and in places suggestion on how to play them. It is a mighty book that lives up to its name!
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Thomas O. Morrison
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Top Notch Monster Manual!
Reviewed in the United States on January 1, 2015
I am an old school D&D gamer/Dungeon Master who cut his teeth on the ''Red'' basic set and then moved into "Advanced Dungeons and Dragons" (1st ed.), all the while trying other stuff like Star Frontiers and I.C.E. By the time 2nd edition came out, I had moved on. Just... See more
I am an old school D&D gamer/Dungeon Master who cut his teeth on the ''Red'' basic set and then moved into "Advanced Dungeons and Dragons" (1st ed.), all the while trying other stuff like Star Frontiers and I.C.E. By the time 2nd edition came out, I had moved on. Just recently, I decided to get back into it and started up a 1st edition campaign. As the new 5th edition material came out, I bought them initially ''out of curiosity'' and have now started a 5th edition campaign. I may move exclusively into 5th edition because of the common sense ideas, ease of play, and stunning packaging. Having the basic set of rule for 5th edition available on line for free makes it easy for new players to prepare before committing to buying anything.

That said, I have to say that I love the "Monster Manual". The artwork is amazing and each monster pretty much gets its own page, with loads of details in an easy-to-read format. In the back of the book is a section of creatures that are not as much monster as wild animal or giant-sized animal and then a section of sample NPCs. In each case, the information presented is easily usable "as is" or in a modified form. I find the information throughout the book easy to reference and access.

From a nostalgic point of view, I still love the 1st editions of Monster Manual, Monster Manual II, and the Fiend Folio for their diverse artwork (some good and some not so good) and background information. The 5th edition is much more consistent in terms of information presented and quality of artwork. First edition had a lot more monsters, but the 5th edition ones are the ones you''d actually use frequently. In essence, this one book serves me just as well as those three volumes did.

Overall, my advice to older gamers who''d think they like to maybe get back into it - start here with the 5th edition. The three core books (PHB, MM, DMG) are superb in presentation and in content. New gamers? In my opinion, the 5th edition is very easy to jump into and have fun with. Start here!
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Mook
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Extremely Disappointed, despite excellent *content*
Reviewed in the United States on June 15, 2019
[Short Version]: My copy of the Monster Manual arrived "new" with a significant printing defect, as have those of some other reviewers. But the majority have no complaints, so it''s up to you whether to... roll the dice. =============== To give some context to this... See more
[Short Version]: My copy of the Monster Manual arrived "new" with a significant printing defect, as have those of some other reviewers. But the majority have no complaints, so it''s up to you whether to... roll the dice.
===============
To give some context to this review, I''ve been playing TTRPGs since the D&D Red Box, though I''ve been out of D&D specifically since 2nd Edition. Recently I''ve decided to add D&D back into the game stable, and was super excited to order all three of the core books.

The Player''s Handbook and Dungeon Master''s Guide were both excellent, in content as well as quality of the books themselves, and I was happy to read them cover to cover. The Monster Manual, though, isn''t a book like that. It''s more for reference, not a straight read-through. So after the introductory chapters, I browsed through the rest and set it aside.

Fast-forward six weeks to this weekend, earlier today, when I pull down the Monster Manual, this product, to put together some encounters for GMing (sorry, DMing) my first D&D game in decades. And imagine the ash in my mouth when I notice, finally, that two of the pages are completely unusable. You can see from the attached pic, it looks like the press just smeared a sheen of ink across that entire fold. Not only are those entries unusable, there are no legal alternatives for printing out PDF page replacements for them.

I understand this kind of thing isn''t a big deal for a lot of gamers, maybe most. And, yes, I could run D&D games for the next 20 years and never once need a Gargoyle or Genie. That''s why I settled on two stars instead of one; that, and the fact the other 99.9+% of the content is just fine, even excellent. But that doesn''t erase the disappointment of having my return to the D&D fold marred by a damaged "new" core book.

Poor form.
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Tim Bannock
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A great-looking tome of dangerous (and fun!) monsters for all levels of play.
Reviewed in the United States on May 26, 2016
A neuronphaser.com review. CONTENT (4/5) With 153 entries, and many featuring multiple statblocks per entry (goblins have the Goblin and the Goblin Boss; Dragons have all of the chromatic and metallic dragons at four different ages) you get an awful lot of... See more
A neuronphaser.com review.

CONTENT (4/5)
With 153 entries, and many featuring multiple statblocks per entry (goblins have the Goblin and the Goblin Boss; Dragons have all of the chromatic and metallic dragons at four different ages) you get an awful lot of monsters in this book. I’m not great at the mathz (English major and all) but I count something like 432 individual stablocks. That’s like 1/10 of the number of times I’ve played D&D, probably, but that’s still significant.

Outside of statblocks, most monsters take up multiple pages, which means you get a pretty in-depth look at how the creature exists in the D&D world (always pretty setting-agnostic, but occasionally with a slipped-in reference to the Forgotten Realms), as well as story hooks and lair information. That’s a lot of content.

Monster Ecologies
Taking a deeper-dive into the information, one finds that there’s a few traits that don’t show up in the statblocks: these are the more “story-oriented” details, and there’s nothing in the statblocks that sum up any organizational ecology notes like in the Monster Manuals and Monstrous Manuals and Monster Compendiums of yesteryear. While I could complain about nostalgia and all that, take a look at the HackMaster: Hacklopedia of Beasts (2011). Not only is it gorgeous, but you also get:
*A picture of the creature’s tracks,
*It’s typical homelands/ranging grounds,
*A size comparison to humans (i.e. adventurers A.K.A. prey) and
*Not one but TWO ecology-type blocks of info.

The Yield is especially cool for a monster-hunting campaign. Just sayin’.

All that info can be way too specific for some people, but when you have the legacy of D&D behind you, it’s not like this information hasn’t already been detailed somewhere before (raise your hands if you read one of the thirty-thousand Monster Ecology articles in DRAGON/DUNGEON mags or on the D&D website over the past 30-odd years), requires zero rules-mechanics updates or conversion work, and can be formatted to fit in a small area of the page if you do some layout wizardry. Compare to a typical Monster Manual entry:

Don’t get the wrong impression here: the monster entries look great! The concept art tells you volumes about the creature through art. The statblock is tight and contained. The descriptive text, though short, is both concise and frankly GOOD; it makes you want to go find one of these suckers and see if you can murder it and take its stuff! I’m just saying that they could’ve done a little more with some of that white-space and added a little extra world-building at little cost.

Building Monsters
Okay, so there’s a teensy-eensy missing, but overall the thing looks great. End of review? Hardly. Let’s actually look at some monster stats, and compare them to the rules in the Dungeon Master’s Guide to see how things stack up if you want to build monsters that fit with the designer’s own rules and regulations.

The Goblin is a Challenge 1/4 creature. Doing out the math from the DMG (p. 274-ish), I came up with Defensive Challenge of 1: 7 hit points, but bumped up due to a higher-than-average AC of 15, and then another two bumps from the Nimble Escape ability, or so the table on p. 280 would have me believe. Goblins have an Offensive Challenge of 1 as well, since they deal out the lowly amount of 5 damage on average, but receive two bumps from Nimble Escape, again. Well, that averages out to a Challenge of 1, not 1/4. Not 1/2, but 1. Hmmm.

What’s the Earth Elemental got going on? Well, he gets a Defensive Challenge boost from multiple Damage Resistances (bludgeoning, piercing, and slashing from nonmagical attacks), so you multiply hit points by 1.5 (assuming a target Challenge of 5) and you get an effective Defensive Challenge of 8. His Offensive Challenge is strictly made up of his attacks, so that’s a rating of 5. Do the math and you get 6.5, but the Earth Elemental has a Challenge rating of 5. Hmmm, again.

Fine, let’s go ultimate-whackadoodle, as I like to say, and check out the Tarrasque, one of the scariest French-looking words I know. He’s got a ridiculous amount of immunities, Legendary Resistance, Magic Resistance…by my calculations, the Tarrasque operates at an effective 935 hit points and AC 27. That’s WAAAY off the charts, by nearly 100 hit points and 8 points of Armor Class. Offensively, we’re looking at a Challenge of 28 (deals about 224 damage/round if you use Swallow in place of Bite, and the +19 to hit bumps it up from 25 to 28). So I guess Challenge 30 makes sense (you’d get 29 mathematically, but considering how far past the charts for Challenge 30 the Tarrasque is in terms of defense, I think 30’s fair).

On the one hand, we aren’t quite meeting expectations with the Challenge rating calculations in the DMG. But on the other hand, we’re not exactly far off on any of these: goblins are worse by 2, earth elementals are worse by 1, and the Tarrasque is about as close to dead-on as we can expect. The DMG tells us that this is as much art as science, and when you look at just how low a goblin’s hit points are, that seems fine, and the earth elemental is — if nothing else — a little bland in terms of combat, and extremely stupid.

Let’s just say the stats are like a B+: they admitted the faults inherent in this system, and while it can be easily broken to a horrible degree, you’d have to pretty much intend to abuse the advice and ignore all existing monsters in order to muck things up too badly.

D&D’s New Sexiness
The new sexy in this edition of the game comes in the form of three things that you absolutely need to keep your eyes on and revisit time and time again as a reminder of how to make 5th edition D&D more tactical, more set-piece battle-ready, more “fantastical” in terms of environments and situations, and generally, just the best of all previous editions. Here they are.

The Introduction
The intro to the book does a fantastic job of providing excellent story hooks and encounter locations for monsters. It’s such a short section, but literally every sentence in there is jam-packed with “Hey DM! D&D may have a legacy so long it seems like ‘generic fantasy’ but here’s a bazillion ideas on what makes D&D adventure-ready, mysterious, and most of all, fun!” You get locales, lairs, and some very evocative ideas.

Lair Actions
Several creatures known for being territorial and carving out nasty lairs get a set of actions called Lair Actions. These show up in the descriptive part of the monster’s entry, because they are made up of three parts:

A description of the types of places that the creature lairs in, usually with enough ideas to develop your own maps.
A set of Lair Actions that occur on initiative count 20 (losing ties) and don’t eat into the creature’s normal actions. The Lair Actions are crazy terrain-based effects, or additional magical abilities that the creature can access due to how their nature suffuses the location of the lair.
A set of Regional Effects that usually cause far-ranging, thematically pertinent changes to the natural terrain and landscape surrounding the creature’s lair.
Aboleths, beholders, dragons, kraken, liches, vampires and more all get lair write-ups, Lair Actions, and Regional Effects. That’s a lot of world-building material that immediately turns into adventuring possibilities, and whether you plan out your campaigns or settings long in advance, or if you go week-to-week, it’s not hard to use this information to really show off the mood and feel of certain powerful creatures. Moreover, you can use these sorts of ideas to beef up individualized NPCs or custom monsters, giving them that extra oomph.

Legendary Actions
Many of the most powerful creatures gain Legendary Actions, which is usually three extra actions the creature can take at the end of another character’s round, and they regenerate each round. It’s kind of like extra reactions, but they are usually more devastating than an opportunity attack, or involve additional means for the creature to gain a significant tactical benefit before taking their turn. For example, a vampire can make a move, or perform a couple different types of attacks (biting is one, and kinda makes a lot of sense for a dude with long canine teeth, I’d say).

In every case, the creature’s Legendary Actions have to be mixed up; you can’t use the same Legendary Action twice in a row. This forces the DM to mix things up and use the variety of actions — not all of which are going to be damaging attacks — to create more tactical combat encounters and feature more movement across the battlefield.

And then there''s Buffagoat.

What?

A short sidebar on page 317 explains how to re-skin statistics to represent a variety of new monsters. It’s great advice, but one of the examples is getting buffalo by way of using the stats for a Giant Goat. Yeah, a Giant Goat. Awesome.

FORM (5/5)
5th Edition hit the deck running with some lovely hardcover books that are filled to the brim with artwork, and has some seriously professional binding. The Monster Manual is the biggest of the three core rulebooks (at least, I’m fairly certain it is), and looks great. Layout and all that is clean, it’s easy to find stuff at a glance — which is hugely important with monster statblocks — and the individual pieces of artwork themselves are phenomenal.

One of my biggest complaints about most RPGs is the lack of “pictures for everything,” and that complaint is absolutely NOT here: there’s a picture for everything. Every monster gets its main profile pic in full, glorious color, and there’s always neat concept-style artwork, plus there’s the occasional half-page or 3/4 page set-piece showing monsters in weird settings, or a kuo-toa summoning what looks like a a dapperly dressed Cthulhu, and so on.

I could go on and on — there’s silly sketches, awesome little “here’s how this thing moves” sketches — but the point is that D&D came back with a crazy art budget, slapped it all together in a gorgeous format, and matched it with ideas and rules that scream ADVENTURE! and FUN! when it comes to building evocative, dangerous monster encounters.
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Michael Lapointe
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The art-too far in the horror direction. Very disappointed. Not healthy for kids or adults really.
Reviewed in the United States on April 17, 2019
I really like 5e. It tries to be balanced and make things challenging. Good. The art, though, especially in the Monster Manual, is way to far in the horror direction. The game suggests it is for 12 and over. This is not something I would want any young teenager looking at.... See more
I really like 5e. It tries to be balanced and make things challenging. Good. The art, though, especially in the Monster Manual, is way to far in the horror direction. The game suggests it is for 12 and over. This is not something I would want any young teenager looking at. Seriously. It is easy in our day and age to just accept or become desensitized to the fact that so many images we are surrounded by are either violent in nature, or disturbing in the direction of horror. These images then are accepted on posters for movies, on book covers, and kids are exposed from a young age. I see this as a big blind spot in our culture. I am all for tolerance and acceptance, but I am also for people developing themselves towards high ideals. This world is full of difficulties, and it is actually as sad thing when a person takes the injuries they receive and responds to life to then pour themselves into the dark side of life. There is a place in human life to delve the dark depths, but not it is actually tragic to get lost in them or to choose to make our world even more dark by making our own selves in these images, even if just in our inner life.

I think it is important sometimes to say things like this. I know many people may really like the art. I still stand and say that this kind of art works on our inner life in ways that actually wear down our inner resources. It is true of movies, books, comics and RPG, if we fill ourselves with dark and stressful things, they wear on us, they have real effects, and they are not positive.

I have worked hard to find such discernment. And the art on this book and many like it go too far, such that I really do not want my young child to see it even around the house. There is no need for a child to see such images, not in books or movies. How many movies we call entertaining include radical violence and murder? Our culture lacks serious discernment about this. I''m a lifelong fan of comics, growing up with Marvel especially, and DC somewhat, and I was enthralled by many images I grew up with (70s and 80s). Today, the images and stories are ever amping up and going too far. Wolverine is a good example of this. A great character, but it is very important to leave certain things to the imagination, or to not take them out to their materialistic conclusion. Today, many people feel that fairy stories, like Grimm''s, are too violent. My understanding of this is that the pictures in fairy tales are spiritual pictures, they speak to inner processes in a child. But in our materialistic culture, Grimm''s stories are brought to full 3D life and they are naturally horror. This comes from a lack of developing a spiritual understanding of evolution, and viewing life purely in materialistic terms. I know the majority of people prefer a completely materialistic view of the world. Again, I call it unfortunate, because we really need to overcome this materialism if we are to have a future that isn''t horror filled, and I don''t mean in stories, but in fact. I expect many who gravitate to D&D do love the fantasy, magic and imaginative aspects of the game. Perhaps many people will appreciate what I am saying. I hope so.

So I just want to say clearly, I really believe it is not healthy to be filled with such imagery as fills this book. The images in the older books, especially Deities and Demigods, were so much better for our imagination. (Not perfect in every case, but the vast majority I still appreciate today.) I wish people realized this more, and helped give the discernment that especially their kids deserve, because mainstream culture is not demonstrating the kind of discernment needed.

I would hope that TSR/Wizards and other companies would take a leading roll in working out of such discernment. I can''t really back the current trends, and I am not sure that I could wholeheartedly introduce my own child to D&D as it is at the moment. Too bad.
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Evilzombie
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Amazing in every way
Reviewed in the United States on June 5, 2019
Pretty much everything about this book is spectacular and amazing, so ill try to condense my thoughts and give you a list of what I loved in this and what I didn''t. PROS: 1. Quality- The hardcover book feels like its well made and will last through many... See more
Pretty much everything about this book is spectacular and amazing, so ill try to condense my thoughts and give you a list of what I loved in this and what I didn''t.

PROS:
1. Quality- The hardcover book feels like its well made and will last through many years and many campaigns, the pages feel like high quality magazine pages.
2. Content- It has great descriptions on hundreds of creatures and monsters. The vast variety is the main selling point here and it does not disappoint.
3. Quantity- The number of monsters and just thinking about all of the work that went into making them is mind boggling. There are stats for everything from bears to humans to dragons and descriptions on everything as well. So many things you will never run out of ideas for an encounter.
4. Freedom- The biggest thing about DnD that they say over and over again in these core books is that the choice of what to do with everything they give you is yours. You dont have to say that zombies come from necromancers, you can say they are virus zombies that multiply like fungi somehow and make 20 different versions of the zombies with different stats based on the template they give you as a starting point. Thats the beauty of the system. Freedom of choice.
5. Artwork- The art is absolutely beautiful and well done. It looks like watercolor and is nicely detailed. The creatures are shown to be just as amazing as you would imagine them to be.

CONS:
1. Weakened Tarrasque - Some wierd choice by the writers made the Tarrasque not as immortal as before.
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Benjahmon
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Attention Druids - Required Core Book
Reviewed in the United States on October 4, 2017
Well constructed as with the other 5E books I''ve received from Amazon thus far. The Monster Manual is pretty much required for DMs and heavily recommended for any players rolling a druid. It has all the stats, descriptions, and challenge ratings for any beast Druids would... See more
Well constructed as with the other 5E books I''ve received from Amazon thus far. The Monster Manual is pretty much required for DMs and heavily recommended for any players rolling a druid. It has all the stats, descriptions, and challenge ratings for any beast Druids would like to transform into and increases the druids role play value tremendously. Surprise your friends by transforming from Bugbear to Quaggoth Spore Servant!
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BW
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Variety of Threats to Challenge Players
Reviewed in the United States on January 16, 2020
Disclaimer: I read the Monster Manual for 3.5 E but never played it so my basis for comparison is minor at best. A LOT of monsters are in this manual, 315 pages of them plus a pair of appendixes for creatures and possible foes. Thus there is a variety available... See more
Disclaimer: I read the Monster Manual for 3.5 E but never played it so my basis for comparison is minor at best.

A LOT of monsters are in this manual, 315 pages of them plus a pair of appendixes for creatures and possible foes. Thus there is a variety available for a dungeon master to throw at their players. Be it straight-up and uncomplicated brawlers such as hill giants, the cunning and numerous smaller creatures like kobolds and goblins, the paranoia caused by the classic mimic or spell-casting creatures like hags, this book has it all.

Except for celestial creatures. Demons, devils, dragons and giants all get large sections for their sub-species and society but the upper planes get less attention. There are three varieties of angels listed and some others like the unicorn but those are all high Challenge Rating creatures; mid-game at the earliest, and there is little more lore for them than other creatures. I understand the reasoning for this, at least, I think I do.

Players are encouraged to fight creatures that are generally evil or threatening. These are feral monsters, devious demons, and rampaging orcs. The number of situations where they would fight angels or unicorns is far more limited. Including them as allies runs the risk of making the players irrelevant. So why waste time on them?

Being a guy who likes lore and world building, I find this disappointing. Although, there is enough to homebrew something, and that can be fun too.

That is also something fun with this book. It''s not something that I can get from other books, which tell a story. This one gives the actors for such a story. After a certain creature''s entry, it is fun to imagine a small little scenario featuring them which makes use of the lore: their habits and diets and such. Also, I like to consider some way to effectively use their stats and features against potential players.

This is another book with gorgeous artwork. Every monster gets their profile picture. The celestials look majestic, the fiends look dangerous and some of the aberrations are just creepy, like the gibbering mouther. This is great for the theater of the imagination.

Trickster Eric Novels gives "Monster Manual for Dungeons and Dragons 5th Edition" an A+
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Top reviews from other countries

A. Rose
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Nice, but Tome of Beasts is nicer
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 25, 2016
More important than the DMG for a DM, contains all the monsters you need to do a basic campaign. It''s the same old monsters you know. You''re not going to be surprised by anything here. Wish there were more psionic things in here though, because int saves are really...See more
More important than the DMG for a DM, contains all the monsters you need to do a basic campaign. It''s the same old monsters you know. You''re not going to be surprised by anything here. Wish there were more psionic things in here though, because int saves are really underused in 5E. Lair action stuff is cool, as is the legendary stuff. Compared to ToB the "alternate versions" are used a lot more, stat blocks are better laid out, not over pages etc, the art is nicer and it feels like a superior product. But content wise, it''s not. If you can get a copy of Tome of Beasts, it has over 400 monsters and is like twice as thick as this with more unusual and original monsters that your players won''t have seen before, deffs recommend picking that up. But this is, like, the core sanctioned on that you''re probs supposed to have. Depends on what you like really. Honestly, I think dragons, undead, goblins, orcs and anthropomorphic animals are all super yawn inducing, very played out, tired concepts that we''ve seen for decades already, so I find the Tome of Beasts stuff more appealing. Low CR monsters all are generally very boring too so it''s not that fun for low level players. So many super high CR monsters that it''s kinda frustrating to leaf through knowing that you''re years away from being able to actually unleash them on your players unless you''re feeling very George R. R. Martin-ish and want to TPK your party. I''m hoping Volo has some more interesting stuff, but let''s be realistic, it''s probably going to have more of the same. It''s just not that interesting when all your best monsters are from Ancient Greek tales and Lovecraft, and your original monsters were invented because you had some cheap Chinese models and wanted to use them as minis (literally where purple worm, owlbear, bulette, rust monsters, umber hulk and a bunch of otehrs come from). Like, given that these people can write half the DM''s guide worth of platitudes on inventing monsters, worlds, dungeons, religions etc, you''d think they could come up with some original monsters that are more interesting than a stat block. I don''t need one of each anthropomorphic animal, each of which has no special ability. But, I digress, I''ve seen this all before a tonne, to a newbie this''d probably all be amazing and interesting so 5* it is.
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Amazon Customer
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Check your copy carefully! Watch out for the bad printing!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 5, 2020
First one had several mis-printed pages - which for a pricy book I do not expect. Smudgy and illegible in several places. make sure you check yours carefully! Sent it back for an exchange - and the replacement had just as many printing errors, on exactly the same pages -...See more
First one had several mis-printed pages - which for a pricy book I do not expect. Smudgy and illegible in several places. make sure you check yours carefully! Sent it back for an exchange - and the replacement had just as many printing errors, on exactly the same pages - I''ve heard other people mention this too, so I guess there was just a badly-printed batch. But for £25 I''d expect to be able to read the book! Other than that, when I got a good one it was great. Nice pics.
4 people found this helpful
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Dr N
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Well presented nice illustrations
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 18, 2014
Well presented with largely very nice illustrations, pretty much one of each monster. All the classic monsters are included (no Green Slime though). Monsters have lots of hit points, do lots of damage, but their Armour Class has been kept within a restricted range and...See more
Well presented with largely very nice illustrations, pretty much one of each monster. All the classic monsters are included (no Green Slime though). Monsters have lots of hit points, do lots of damage, but their Armour Class has been kept within a restricted range and rarely goes above AC 20. This is all part of the new (5th) edition rules which have simplified the game mechanic to avoid the mathematical nightmare of having to calculate all the modifiers from over-buffed characters. The monsters stats have been simplified and look more manageable for the Dungeon Master, especially at higher levels. Aside from the stats the rest of the page for each monster is information on background, habitat, culture etc. I did not give this product five stars as some of the printing is not sharp on a number of pages (pretty poor really) whilst some pages have stuck together close to the spine. Should have printed in China! It would probably be best to buy this from your local games store rather than Amazon so that you can check you have a good copy.
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Rotgut
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Monstrously Good,
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 5, 2016
Great roleplaying supplement and also a great read. Immense piece of work, authors and artists to be congratulated. I have never felt the need to replace my 1979 Gary Gygax authored Advanced D&D Monster Manual, with the infamous David Sutherland "Flying Red...See more
Great roleplaying supplement and also a great read. Immense piece of work, authors and artists to be congratulated. I have never felt the need to replace my 1979 Gary Gygax authored Advanced D&D Monster Manual, with the infamous David Sutherland "Flying Red Cow" cover illustration and so it is this venerable tome that I compared this new book to. How does it compare ? Well, the first thing to say is that this is very close to an updated version of Gygax''s original....about 75%of the creatures here (pure guess) were in the 1979 book,and the vast majority of the rest appeared in the Fiend Folio or Monster Manual 2, the AD&D follow ups to the MM. The illustrations in the Gygax version are all (well, apart from the cover|) excellent, here the production values are higher and the pictures are in colour, at the very least the 5th edition version matches the original in this important area. The updated stats for the monsters, the main point of the book, of course, are, as user friendly as the original, most entries are a page or less and a range of levels from very low to very high. One area, where, I am afraid to admit,. this new Monster Manual does improve on Gary Gygax''s is the texts on many of the creatures include short histories and ecologies which are absolutely perfect for inspiration for adventures, As one example the entries for " Centaur" both show great illustrations, have broadly similar game stats and, of course, are recognisably the same legendary figure from Greek myth. The new description though also has two adventure seeds within it, the centaur migration lasting generations coming into conflict with human cities built in their way and the old or lame centaur been left behind and having to be helped . Any DM worth their salt should be able to knock off an adventure...or even a campaign of adventures based on these hints. Lots of the descriptions include nuggets like these and as the point of game books like this is to spark players'' imaginations this is a massively useful aspect of this work. Every D&D player will have their own ideas of how these monsters should be portrayed, not all will agree with every interpretation here but the introduction sensibly points out players can amend or ignore any of the information given here .Having said that, some of the decisions...Pixies not being Chaotic ? Tarrasques not been evil ? seem a bit odd. Monsters omitted also seem unfortunate..although some (eg Phase Spider) appear in the appendix , giving slightly shorter descriptions of creatures. No Titan though (replaced by the Empyrean) and no room for the Vargoyle, one of my faves. Some monsters included could also have perhaps have been consigned to history...do we REALLY need the Modrons?Or the Flumph?! My favourite enrty is the Kenku, brilliantly designed , again so that even an encounter with one will be an adventure in itself. Lead writer Chris Perkins has penned numerous adventures and it really shows. Not absolutely all monsters are a triumph, the Genies seem uninspired, for example, but the majority...Demons, Devils, Golems, etc etc are inspired. A shame a list of the original creators of the monsters couldn''t be included somewhere in this lengthy tome...I recall many of these (Hook Horror, Giths. Kenku etc|) were designed by the fan community and it would have been nice for this to be acknowledged. The front cover illo , is, perhaps, not as striking as some of the interior pictures (how awesome would the Barlgura or the Hobgobiln or Werewolf illustration look on the front of the book?) but the Beholder is THE definitive D&D critter and surely beats a flying cow !
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Grim_Tidings
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
3rd Core book - Makes your monsters come to life
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 1, 2017
5th Edition Monster Manuel, contains all your foes that have come and gone and those yet to be. This is more important for the GM/DM to create foes for the players but is potentially useful for the players, especially if they have pets, allies etc... An essential book for...See more
5th Edition Monster Manuel, contains all your foes that have come and gone and those yet to be. This is more important for the GM/DM to create foes for the players but is potentially useful for the players, especially if they have pets, allies etc... An essential book for the running of DnD games.
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Monster Manual

The A to Z Fantasy Bestiary

This bestiary is for storytellers and worldbuilders. If you have ever thought about running a Dungeons & Dragons game for your friends, either a single night’s adventure or a long-running campaign, this tome contains page after page of inspiration. It’s your one-stop shop for creatures both malevolent and benign.

The Monster Manual presents a horde of classic Dungeons & Dragons creatures, including dragons, giants, mind flayers, and beholders—a monstrous feast for Dungeon Masters ready to challenge their players and populate their adventures.

Meet the Menagerie

"The dungeon's floors were spotless. That should have been our first clue."—from the Journal of Jaster Hallowquill, on his first exploration of Undermountain

Populate your world with beasts both wondrous and sinister.

Horrifying mind flayers, shimmering unicorns, jiggly gelatinous cubes—this book contains over 150 ready-to-play, easy-to-run monsters of all levels to challenge heroes throughout their adventuring careers.

Common beasts mingle with the weird, the terrifying, and the ridiculous, inhabiting nearly every climate and terrain imaginable. Whether your adventure takes place in a swamp, a dungeon, or the outer planes of existence, there are creatures in this book to populate that environment.

Know Your Enemy

"The only good thing about owlbears is that the wizard who created them is probably dead."—Xarshel Ravenshadow, Gnome Professor of Transmutative Science at Morgrave University

Create thrilling encounters with iconic monsters.

When does an owlbear hunt its prey? Can fire hurt a pseudodragon? How fearsome is a hydra’s bite? Knowing the answers to questions like these is crucial to running a D&D adventure.

The Monster Manual gives you easy access to everything you need to know about creatures large and small. Hit points, damage resistances, legendary actions—stat blocks for each monster include all the information you need to craft encounters, while still being easily scannable when you need a quick reference.

Bring Your World to Life

"Slay me once, shame on you. Slay me twice, shame on me."—Rakshasa maxim

Feed your imagination with art and detailed descriptions.

The best thing about being a DM is that you get to invent your own fantasy world and bring it to life, and nothing brings a D&D world to life more than the creatures that inhabit it.

D&D games are narratives, and great narrators do more than just tell the story. They create a picture in the minds of their audience. From the color of the vapor from a gorgon’s nose to a single, curious detail that marks a rakshasa in disguise —the Monster Manual's rich descriptions and beautiful illustrations will breathe life into your campaign.

Playing Dungeons & Dragons

Become an Adventurer

Adventurers come in all shapes and sizes. Find one that’s fun for you.

An elvish cleric, driven from society for trespassing on tradition. A dwarven paladin, atoning for an ignominious past. The Player’s Handbook provides the skeleton for your characters. Flesh them out however you choose.

Join the Party

D&D brings people together and forges new friendships. Silly moments spawn inside jokes; moving battles leave treasured memories—whether in the heat of battle, embroiled in social intrigue, or solving clever puzzles, your party has your back.

Choose Your Own Path

The woods are growing dark. Behind a mass of ivy, you see the stones of a crumbling castle. What do you do?

In D&D, your options are limitless. Because the Dungeon Master, as narrator of your tale, can improvise in reaction to any choice you make, what happens next is entirely flexible. Do you dare go on?

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