popular The sale Bluest lowest Eye (Vintage International) outlet online sale

popular The sale Bluest lowest Eye (Vintage International) outlet online sale

popular The sale Bluest lowest Eye (Vintage International) outlet online sale
popular The sale Bluest lowest Eye (Vintage International) outlet online sale__below
popular The sale Bluest lowest Eye (Vintage International) outlet online sale_top
popular The sale Bluest lowest Eye (Vintage International) outlet online sale__front

Description

Product Description

Nobel Prize winner Toni Morrison powerfully examines our obsession with beauty and conformity—and asks questions about race, class, and gender with her characteristic subtly and grace.
 
In Morrison’s bestselling first novel, Pecola Breedlove—an 11-year-old Black girl in an America whose love for its blond, blue-eyed children can devastate all others—prays for her eyes to turn blue: so that she will be beautiful, so that people will look at her, so that her world will be different. This is the story of the nightmare at the heart of her yearning, and the tragedy of its fulfillment.
 
Here, Morrison’s writing is “so precise, so faithful to speech and so charged with pain and wonder that the novel becomes poetry” (The New York Times).

Review

A TODAY SHOW #ReadWithJenna BOOK CLUB PICK! 

“So precise, so faithful to speech and so charged with pain and wonder that the novel becomes poetry.”  —The New York Times

“A profoundly successful work of fiction. . . . Taut and understated, harsh in its detachment, sympathetic in its truth . . . it is an experience.” —The Detroit Free Press


“This story commands attention, for it contains one black girl’s universe.” —Newsweek

About the Author

Toni Morrison is the author of eleven novels, from The Bluest Eye (1970) to God Help the Child (2015). She received the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Pulitzer Prize, and in 1993 she was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. She died in 2019.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Nuns go by as quiet as lust, and drunken men and sober eyes sing in the lobby of the Greek hotel. Rosemary Villanucci, our next-door friend who lives above her father''s cafe, sits in a 1939 Buick eating bread and butter. She rolls down the window to tell my sister Frieda and me that we can''t come in. We stare at her, wanting her bread, but more than that wanting to poke the arrogance out of her eyes and smash the pride of ownership that curls her chewing mouth. When she comes out of the car we will beat her up, make red marks on her white skin, and she will cry and ask us do we want her to pull her pants down. We will say no. We don''t know what we should feel or do if she does, but whenever she asks us, we know she is offering us something precious and that our own pride must be asserted by refusing to accept.


School has started, and Frieda and I get new brown stockings and cod-liver oil. Grown-ups talk in tired, edgy voices about Zick''s Coal Company and take us along in the evening to the railroad tracks where we fill burlap sacks with the tiny pieces of coal lying about. Later we walk home, glancing back to see the great carloads of slag being dumped, red hot and smoking, into the ravine that skirts the steel mill. The dying fire lights the sky with a dull orange glow. Frieda and I lag behind, staring at the patch of color surrounded by black. It is impossible not to feel a shiver when our feet leave the gravel path and sink into the dead grass in the field.


Our house is old, cold, and green. At night a kerosene lamp lights one large room. The others are braced in darkness, peopled by roaches and mice. Adults do not talk to us -- they give us directions. They issue orders without providing information. When we trip and fall down they glance at us; if we cut or bruise ourselves, they ask us are we crazy. When we catch colds, they shake their heads in disgust at our lack of consideration. How, they ask us, do you expect anybody to get anything done if you all are sick? We cannot answer them. Our illness is treated with contempt, foul Black Draught, and castor oil that blunts our minds.


When, on a day after a trip to collect coal, I cough once, loudly, through bronchial tubes already packed tight with phlegm, my mother frowns. "Great Jesus. Get on in that bed. How many times do I have to tell you to wear something on your head? You must be the biggest fool in this town. Frieda? Get some rags and stuff that window."


Frieda restuffs the window. I trudge off to bed, full of guilt and self-pity. I lie down in my underwear, the metal in the black garters hurts my legs, but I do not take them off, because it is too cold to lie stockingless. It takes a long time for my body to heat its place in the bed. Once I have generated a silhouette of warmth, I dare not move, for there is a cold place one-half inch in any direction. No one speaks to me or asks how I feel. In an hour or two my mother comes. Her hands are large and rough, and when she rubs the Vicks salve on my chest, I am rigid with pain. She takes two fingers'' full of it at a time, and massages my chest until I am faint. Just when I think I will tip over into a scream, she scoops out a little of the salve on her forefinger and puts it in my mouth, telling me to swallow. A hot flannel is wrapped about my neck and chest. I am covered up with heavy quilts and ordered to sweat, which I do, promptly.


Later I throw up, and my mother says, "What did you puke on the bed clothes for? Don''t you have sense enough to hold your head out the bed? Now, look what you did. You think I got time for nothing but washing up your puke?"


The puke swaddles down the pillow onto the sheet -- green-gray, with flecks of orange. It moves like the insides of an uncooked egg. Stubbornly clinging to its own mass, refusing to break up and be removed. How, I wonder, can it be so neat and nasty at the same time?


My mother''s voice drones on. She is not talking to me. She is talking to the puke, but she is calling it my name: Claudia. She wipes it up as best she can and puts a scratchy towel over the large wet place. I lie down again. The rags have fallen from the window crack, and the air is cold. I dare not call her back and am reluctant to leave my warmth. My mother''s anger humiliates me; her words chafe my cheeks, and I am crying. I do not know that she is not angry at me, but at my sickness. I believe she despises my weakness for letting the sickness "take holt." By and by I will not get sick; I will refuse to. But for now I am crying. I know I am making more snot, but I can''t stop.


My sister comes in. Her eyes are full of sorrow. She sings to me: "When the deep purple falls over sleepy garden walls, someone thinks of me. . . ." I doze, thinking of plums, walls, and "someone."


But was it really like that? As painful as I remember? Only mildly. Or rather, it was a productive and fructifying pain. Love, thick and dark as Alaga syrup, eased up into that cracked window. I could smell it -- taste it -- sweet, musty, with an edge of wintergreen in its base -- everywhere in that house. It stuck, along with my tongue, to the frosted windowpanes. It coated my chest, along with the salve, and when the flannel came undone in my sleep, the clear, sharp curves of air outlined its presence on my throat. And in the night, when my coughing was dry and tough, feet padded into the room, hands repinned the flannel, readjusted the quilt, and rested a moment on my forehead. So when I think of autumn, I think of somebody with hands who does not want me to die.

Product information

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Videos

Help others learn more about this product by uploading a video!
Upload video
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who bought this item also bought

Customer reviews

4.6 out of 54.6 out of 5
8,334 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

P. Whoody
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A valuable lesson learned from Toni Morrison and Starbucks
Reviewed in the United States on February 27, 2016
One day, i was working on contract in Northern CA, many years ago. I was walking into a Starbucks to have my Saturday morning tea before heading over to the gym. I am athletically built, but will not "flaunt" my physique in public. Thus, i always wore over-sized... See more
One day, i was working on contract in Northern CA, many years ago. I was walking into a Starbucks to have my Saturday morning tea before heading over to the gym. I am athletically built, but will not "flaunt" my physique in public. Thus, i always wore over-sized sweats which were comfortable.

A tall skinny black guy was heading toward the same Starbucks door on foot, like myself. He looked at me. He had with him his prize possession. A half-dressed, skinny asian female with him. She was cylindrically built, flat chested, no butt - but half naked. A far cry from the physique of a professional athlete. But they didn''t see that. All they both saw was a black chick - probably overweight- in baggy sweats. *ugh*.

Upon seeing me, his lips pressed into a thin line, his eyes went flat with absolute hatred. I''ve seen that look my whole life from young black men. Then suddenly, he grinned. He knew we were going into the same Starbucks, so he grabbed his lady-friend''s hand and started walking quickly. So quickly that he opened the door for her, then swiftly turned around, smiled in my face - and SLAMMED THE DOOR before i could grab the handle.

Everyone in Starbucks saw this action. I held my head up, walked into that Starbucks and stood in line right beside that couple. He gave me a belligerent stare wondering if i was going to do something to his "property". Though i was furious? I did not show it. Though i was ashamed. I did not show it. I ordered my tea when it was time, sat down and drank it. People were still staring even after that couple left. No one knew what to say. Regardless i did not sink that child''s level. I held my head high, and sipped my tea.

This bought back so many humiliations in the past of how black people treat each other. I saw it within my family, school, my jobs, everywhere.

And believe it or not, i once wished for blue or green eyes as well. Anything but my liquid deep brown, big, round eyes. Having blue eyes would have stunned so many that i thought were my enemies into silence. I would have been treated better by not only my own counter-parts - but by white people as well.

Actually, that turned out not to be the case. Blue eyes don''t mean anything if you don''t love yourself. Just like that black guy who had attained what he considers a "prize" asian female. If you hate everything about yourself, nothing is going to change that. He was projecting everything he hated about himself - onto me. If it wasn''t me? It would have been someone else of his culture.

Toni Morrison shows us, in this novel what the consequences are, if we seek "physical attributes/objects" to overpower the mental insufficiencies. I, and so many others could have gone the route of Pecola. In Toni Morrison''s novel. A very valuable lesson is taught. Regardless of how blue your eyes are, if you''re insecure? They will never be blue enough.
695 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
FlowerSystem
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
TW; CSA
Reviewed in the United States on March 29, 2017
This book is really difficult to read if you''re sensitive to themes of child sexual abuse, general child abuse, racism, and some animal abuse. Honestly, if you''ve been abused I wouldn''t recommend it unless you have to read it for a class because it takes the perspective of... See more
This book is really difficult to read if you''re sensitive to themes of child sexual abuse, general child abuse, racism, and some animal abuse. Honestly, if you''ve been abused I wouldn''t recommend it unless you have to read it for a class because it takes the perspective of the rapist during the rape scene which was really difficult for me to read personally.
HOWEVER, if you haven''t experienced abuse, this is a really important book. It gives you an important and vastly underrepresented perspective on the ways systems built on racism and neglect fail children of color and allow for horrific things to happen to them, and the narration of the book is actually beautiful and very compelling. It is hard to read, it is difficult subject material, but push through it. It''s a good and worthwhile book.
249 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Keglan
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Great American Novel
Reviewed in the United States on June 22, 2017
I recently reread this book. I had read it several years before. I was amazed at how much I had forgotten. Practically all of it. I want to make this review about the book and not about me, but I kept asking myself over and over how I could not have remembered this... See more
I recently reread this book. I had read it several years before. I was amazed at how much I had forgotten. Practically all of it. I want to make this review about the book and not about me, but I kept asking myself over and over how I could not have remembered this brilliant novel. I''m a middle-aged white man, so maybe it wasn''t relevant enough to me or my lifestyle. Or; maybe my brain rejected the disturbing elements, which our sometimes nine-year-old chronicler Claudia MacTeer treats like they are just a normal part of life. I was much younger the first time I read this book, and since that time, having some close friends who are African-American relate to me over a beer some of their stories, I want to know. I want to know how this oppression of the soul still exists to this very day. How can the average white person even begin to understand events like Ferguson? Sadly, not very many try to. Books like this one, Richard Wright''s "Native Son", Ralph Ellison''s "Invisible Man" and so much other great literature of this genre are must reads, in my opinion, for every American. Pecola Breedlove''s desire to have blue eyes like the little blonde-haired girl at the house her mother is employed as housekeeper, is heartbreaking on so many levels, especially after her own personal tragedy.
127 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Robyn
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A must read
Reviewed in the United States on January 30, 2017
This is a MUST read. This book is dark and powerful, poetic and real. All at once feeling like you want to run into the main character''s vulnerable pain but wanting to look away at the same time. Morrison''s command of writing is perfection. Absolute perfection. The forward... See more
This is a MUST read. This book is dark and powerful, poetic and real. All at once feeling like you want to run into the main character''s vulnerable pain but wanting to look away at the same time. Morrison''s command of writing is perfection. Absolute perfection. The forward is also very helpful to read to give context to when she wrote it, her approach and what she may have wanted to change. Wonderful to read an artist''s self-reflection. If you''re a white woman looking to learn more about black women and men''s experiences of internalized and institutionalized racism and dismantle your privilege, this book is for you. Be prepared to cry and think hard.
114 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Shanaye
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Because I know what it feels like to want blue eyes.
Reviewed in the United States on April 25, 2020
I’ve never really wanted blue eyes but I’ve always felt ashamed of my blackness growing up. I was always Black Gyal or Blackie. I was never Shanise. I was always, “nothing too black is good” or “your cousins are prettier than you because they’re lighter”. So I’ve always... See more
I’ve never really wanted blue eyes but I’ve always felt ashamed of my blackness growing up. I was always Black Gyal or Blackie. I was never Shanise. I was always, “nothing too black is good” or “your cousins are prettier than you because they’re lighter”. So I’ve always wanted, lighter skin, smaller shoulders, a straighter nose and a prettier face.

I grew up though, I grew when my smile was seen and I was told how beautiful it was. I grew into myself, mentally and emotionally and I learned to love me in ways that my family could not. Now at 30, I am so beautiful, inside and out. This black skin that I proudly wear is evident of that. I wouldn’t want to be anything but a black woman.

The essence of colorism in the black community was captured in all its glory in this book. The wanting to be something you’re not, Pecola, while accepting what you are, Claudia, captured two sides of the same coin when it comes to black lives. The love of whiteness and the hatred of blackness that was taught to our ancestors is still heredity even in today’s society. This is a book that all black girls and boys need to read. This should be a right of passage.

Toni Morrison did a great job with this book. The Bluest Eyes invoked anger, pity, laughter and pride in 2689 pages of magnificent! I read it all in one go, I dear not put it down because I was so enthralled. Thank you.
31 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Anon
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Loathsome and vulgar
Reviewed in the United States on September 15, 2020
Wish I could give this book negative stars. Quite simply; it is pornographic, degenerate and perverted. How twisted a person’s mind has to be to first imagine and then write on paper is disturbing. The book leaves you feeling filthy. The vulgar nature of the content... See more
Wish I could give this book negative stars. Quite simply; it is pornographic, degenerate and perverted. How twisted a person’s mind has to be to first imagine and then write on paper is disturbing. The book leaves you feeling filthy. The vulgar nature of the content destroys any redeeming qualities this book might of had.
Knowing this book is what is being taught in college/ap classes it is now easy to understand how/why American Society is collapsing. Terrible, terrible book.
25 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Ann C. Bales
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Disturbing explicit despcriptions of child molestation
Reviewed in the United States on August 9, 2019
I am distrurbed by the explicit scenes of child molestation described in this book. It should come with a warning similar to movie ratings. Certainly not something I would want my children reading in school.
27 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Walden Dea
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
It describes in great detail, the life of an African American child ...
Reviewed in the United States on March 8, 2017
Toni Morrison''s “The Bluest Eye” is a unique novel that is not for the lighthearted. It describes in great detail, the life of an African American child raised in tough circumstances. During a time period of depression, the protagonist is often found in the worst... See more
Toni Morrison''s “The Bluest Eye” is a unique novel that is not for the lighthearted. It describes in great detail, the life of an African American child raised in tough circumstances. During a time period of depression, the protagonist is often found in the worst situations. Men are often portrayed as dirty predators, while women are portrayed more as sexual objects. Throughout the book lies a dark tone of hatred towards the protagonist and rarely shows any hope for the her. As more of the protagonist’s and her family’s past is revealed, the darker the story gets. Through the young girl she portrays the issues of self confidence when influenced by society''s norms. She makes a statement that we favor society’s opinion too much, always idolizing the covergirl look. The book points out that girls chase beauty standards to a point that is volatile. The focus on beauty goes hand in hand with how women are portrayed for the time era. Morrison also attempts to display how men and women change and develop through the book’s large character set that has many opposing values.While the novel may be slow and confusing in the first chapters, the book hooks the reader with story that grabs your heart. The story is a huge tear jerker. I recommend this book to those who can enjoy a depressing book. This book is also touches on sensitive subjects, contains explicit scenes, and has very crude language, so this book is for a more mature audience.
30 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report

Top reviews from other countries

Amazon Customer
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An amazing, gut-wrenching
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 2, 2017
An amazing, gut-wrenching, sad book, which should be required reading for all Americans, yet I gave it 4 stars because I didn''t enjoy it at ALL. Toni Morrison does not flinch from the barest of truths about racism - both in terms of the way beauty has been historically...See more
An amazing, gut-wrenching, sad book, which should be required reading for all Americans, yet I gave it 4 stars because I didn''t enjoy it at ALL. Toni Morrison does not flinch from the barest of truths about racism - both in terms of the way beauty has been historically portrayed in a fair-skinned, blue eyed, blonde idealistic way, and in terms of the historical and present day racism facing African-American children in America. As I read this book, I happened to see an ad for new dolls with natural black hair, and I was so glad. Morrison tells the story of poor Pecola, a set upon, tragic little girl with a damaged mother and a vicious, abused father, Polly and Cholly in a series of stories that intertwine. Pecola comes to live with another family with two fiestier, funnier little girls. This somehow makes her even more tragic. Morrison shows how chance encounters affect the characters view of themselves growing up, and how this in turn hurts their children. She uses language that no one else dares use, and is critical of the way that some African-Americans have willingly enabled a racist culture that holds their own children back while prioritising others. Sexual abuse is another central theme. I can''t help but think that this is in part autobiographical. I loved it, but hated it too. It made me so angry and so sad, but I am glad I gave it my time. I don''t think I will ever be able to forget this book.
43 people found this helpful
Report
Jacqueline
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great piece of literary work ...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 9, 2019
This is the first book I''ve read by Toni Morrison. The language and prose are phenomenal in bringing the narrative to life. At first, I wasn''t sure about the writing. For example, Toni heads several chapters with paragraphs that has no spaces and seems to fall short of a...See more
This is the first book I''ve read by Toni Morrison. The language and prose are phenomenal in bringing the narrative to life. At first, I wasn''t sure about the writing. For example, Toni heads several chapters with paragraphs that has no spaces and seems to fall short of a meaning however, this is all very much part of the overall theme of the lives of a poor black family in the 1940''s with the emphasis on the protagonist Pecola who prays for Blue eyes so she can be like her white schoolmates. Themes such as incest, rape and feeling like an outcast are well-addressed. I lingered in the ''Afterword'' chapter as Toni expressed and summarized the writing of The Bluest Eye in such a way that I will be reading this novel again with these moments in mind.
12 people found this helpful
Report
Pauline Butcher Bird
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Disappointing
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 7, 2019
After Toni Morrison''s recent death and rave reviews, I read this, her first novel, but am disappointed. Yes, I liked the young black girl''s stories and life seen through their eyes and I got the houses they lived in and their poverty and squalor, but then the author gets in...See more
After Toni Morrison''s recent death and rave reviews, I read this, her first novel, but am disappointed. Yes, I liked the young black girl''s stories and life seen through their eyes and I got the houses they lived in and their poverty and squalor, but then the author gets in the way and passes endless judgements about particular groups of people, for example, types of young girls. It''s over-written with poetic language that purports to be profound. Twenty-five percent could have been taken out without loss. I skipped and skipped. Even Picolo''s yearning for blue eyes failed to move me. I will read Beloved as I''m told that is Morrison''s masterpiece.
10 people found this helpful
Report
Michael Clark
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Ok
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 25, 2018
It’s beautifully written but not really my thing. Have you ever needed up with a book outside your genres because everyone tells you its amazing...? But then found it doesn’t do it for you? That is me and this book
12 people found this helpful
Report
Robyn Jaye
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
so wonderfully written....
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 28, 2019
ashamed to say this was my first Toni Morrison book but won''t be my last. I loved the authors way of describing people and their simple complexities. It was insightful, thought proving and overall and enjoyable read (although slightly disturbing in places)
8 people found this helpful
Report
See all reviews
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who viewed this item also viewed

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Pages with related products.

  • green hills
  • realistic fiction books
  • realistic fiction
  • toni morrison
  • big bend
  • wrapped up




Product information

popular The sale Bluest lowest Eye (Vintage International) outlet online sale

popular The sale Bluest lowest Eye (Vintage International) outlet online sale

popular The sale Bluest lowest Eye (Vintage International) outlet online sale

popular The sale Bluest lowest Eye (Vintage International) outlet online sale

popular The sale Bluest lowest Eye (Vintage International) outlet online sale

popular The sale Bluest lowest Eye (Vintage International) outlet online sale

popular The sale Bluest lowest Eye (Vintage International) outlet online sale

popular The sale Bluest lowest Eye (Vintage International) outlet online sale

popular The sale Bluest lowest Eye (Vintage International) outlet online sale

popular The sale Bluest lowest Eye (Vintage International) outlet online sale

popular The sale Bluest lowest Eye (Vintage International) outlet online sale

popular The sale Bluest lowest Eye (Vintage International) outlet online sale

popular The sale Bluest lowest Eye (Vintage International) outlet online sale

popular The sale Bluest lowest Eye (Vintage International) outlet online sale

popular The sale Bluest lowest Eye (Vintage International) outlet online sale

popular The sale Bluest lowest Eye (Vintage International) outlet online sale

popular The sale Bluest lowest Eye (Vintage International) outlet online sale

popular The sale Bluest lowest Eye (Vintage International) outlet online sale

popular The sale Bluest lowest Eye (Vintage International) outlet online sale

popular The sale Bluest lowest Eye (Vintage International) outlet online sale

popular The sale Bluest lowest Eye (Vintage International) outlet online sale

popular The sale Bluest lowest Eye (Vintage International) outlet online sale

popular The sale Bluest lowest Eye (Vintage International) outlet online sale

popular The sale Bluest lowest Eye (Vintage International) outlet online sale

popular The sale Bluest lowest Eye (Vintage International) outlet online sale

popular The sale Bluest lowest Eye (Vintage International) outlet online sale

popular The sale Bluest lowest Eye (Vintage International) outlet online sale